All
News
Exhibition
Events
Studios
Workshops
Education
Publications
2021 11.05.2021
Tuesday Workshop VII
Michael Dreyer
Events
Discussion
11.05.2021
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

Michael Dreyer

is a German artist and designer. He is professor for visual communication at the Merz Academy, University of Design, Art and Media, Stuttgart, and was involved in its realignment in 1982. In 2006 Dreyer founded the “W.O. Scheibe Museum” project as a temporary exhibition space in Stuttgart, continued in the form of film performances (Atelier, 2012, by Peter Ott and Abwinkl ’83, 2021 ff., Video review by and with Dreyer).

 

___

 

Tuesday Workshop

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc., and is open to everyone!

The new format was initiated by Ronald Kolb and is supported by the Künstlerhaus advisory board.

2021 14.04.–07.07.2021
Satellit Stuttgart
News
Events
14.04.–07.07.2021
Raum- und Projektstipendien am Schlossplatz
Curated by:
Karima Klasen

Season 1 — Auf der Umlaufbahn

 

Folgende Künstler:innen und Kollektive wurden für die Satellit Raum- und Projektstipendien 2021 am Schlossplatz ausgewählt:

 

Episode I

Mi 14.04.21—Mi 28.04.21

Lowland

 

Episode II

Mi 28.04.21—Mi 12.05.21

Thomas Weber

 

Episode III

Mi 12.05.21—Mi 26.05.21

Ann-Josephin Dietz

 

Episode IV

Mi 26.05.21—Mi 09.06.21

Friedrich Hensen

 

Episode V

Mi 09.06.21—Mi 23.06.21

Min Bark, Mizi Lee, Johanna Mangold, Paula Pelz

 

Episode VI

Mi 23.06.21—Mi 07.07.21

Linienscharen

 

SATELLIT STUTTGART ist ein Zusammenschluss von Künstler:innen in Kooperation mit dem Künstlerhaus Stuttgart und gefördert von der Wüstenrot Stiftung im Rahmen der Sonderförderung Kultur trotz Corona.

 

Die aktuelle Situation bringt für soloselbstständige Künstler:innen, Gestalter:innen und Kulturschaffende viele Herausforderungen mit sich. Satellit Stuttgart soll eine Plattform sein, durch die freie Projekte jetzt sichtbar werden. Wir möchten unser lokales Netzwerk stärken und weitreichende, interdisziplinäre Dialoge generieren.

 

Wir suchen nach neuen Orten der Kunst im öffentlichen Raum und wünschen uns Kooperation und Kollaboration unterschiedlicher Akteur:innen, um in unserer gegenwärtigen Lebensrealität Kunst weiterhin zu produzieren und erfahrbar zu machen.

 

Mit Satellit Stuttgart schaffen wir ein neues Format eines temporären, innerstädtischen Kunstraums, zu dem wir professionelle soloselbständige Künstler:innen, Gestalter:innen und Kollektive aus Stuttgart und Umgebung einladen, sich mit einem Projektvorschlag zu bewerben.

 

Durch Satellit wird eine leerstehende Ladenfläche in der Stuttgarter Innenstadt für 3 Monate (April—Juli) zum temporären Atelier, Ausstellungs- und Galerieraum, zur Interventions- und Experimentierfläche für Kulturschaffende unterschiedlicher Sparten.

 

Die Projektstipendien werden jeweils für zwei Wochen (14 Tage) an eine/n Künstler:in (oder eine Künstler-gruppe/Kollektiv) vergeben. Enthalten sind, die Nutzung der Ladenfläche und ein Projektkostenzuschuss/Honorar in Höhe von 800€. Den Auf-/Abbau und Transport organisieren die Projektstipendiat:innen selbst.

 

Aktuelle Informationen:

Instagram @satellit_stuttgart

www.kuenstlerhaus.de

Kontakt: satellit@kuenstlerhaus.de

Design: Stefanie Schwarz
2021 13.04.2021
Tuesday Workshop VI
Ania Corcilius
Events
Discussion
13.04.2021
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

For our sixth Tuesday workshop we invite Ania Corcilius. Due to current regulations, this event will also take place online. You can join the event via Zoom:

 

Join the meeting:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86556521495?pwd=d3l6aENSTUFhZ3RoQjk4UUQzd2NTZz09

 

Meeting-ID: 865 5652 1495
Kenncode: 656406

Ania Corcilius

studied at the HfbK Hamburg and the Whitney Independent Study Program New York. The thematic focus of her artistic-curatorial work is the city as a social space. After many years, first in Berlin and then in San Francisco, Ania Corcilius now lives with her family in Stuttgart. Since 2018 she has been involved in the Stadtlücken e.V.

 

___

 

Tuesday Workshop

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc., and is open to everyone!

The new format was initiated by Ronald Kolb and is supported by the Künstlerhaus advisory board.

Ania Corcilius, Umbau-Workshop, 1996
2021 27.03.–25.07.2021
The Supporters
Eva Barto
Exhibition
27.03.–25.07.2021
Discussion with Eva Barto online livestream, Co-presented with the Kunstverein Nürnberg, with Milan Ther (Director, Kunstverein Nürnberg), and Eric Golo Stone (Artistic Director, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart):
Tue, 27.04.2021
19:00 o’clock

Please note: due to public health requirements, the exhibition is closed until further notice. Künstlerhaus Stuttgart will send a follow up announcement as soon as the exhibition space reopens.

The artist Eva Barto consistently realizes her work through a situationally-specific reconsideration of the very conditions and relations by which her work is produced and circulated. Barto often internalizes, repurposes, and complicates the existing socioeconomic materials and arrangements that constitute a particular site of cultural work. Barto’s exhibition at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart reconsiders the legal-economic infrastructure by which financial giving is managed in the art sector. Rather than solely reflect on the transactional structures of monetary gifts, financial support, and philanthropy at large, Barto’s exhibition actualizes a specific set of grantor-grantee, donor-donee, and sponsor-sponsee relations. The transactional order for these actualized relations and effects are governed through a system of distinct contractual agreements, which the artist conceptualized and implemented within the material and temporal dimensions of her exhibition. For Barto, to produce transparency and disclosure on financial giving and reciprocal compensation in the field of art today, is to challenge the idealization of independence by emphasizing the messy, enmeshed, and consequential dependencies that define actual lived relations and working conditions.

 

The current problem field of financial support for the arts is widely recognized. Fundraising within the global art sector is dominated by privately governed legal-economic arrangements attributed to charitable giving and philanthropy. The US system of arts funding—which since the early 1980s has been wholly structured as a political economy of individual financial contributions, and entirely overdetermined by privately governed philanthropy—is increasingly adopted by art contexts around the world. For instance, donor advised funds and other similar legal mechanisms are being considered in various legal jurisdictions as a means of transforming publicly funded cultural services into opportunities for the non-disclosure management of private assets incentivized by tax deductions and returns on investment. Art institutions are key to considering the investment capacity of non-profits. Institutions that produce and distribute artistic work are widely utilized as havens for tax-avoidance, while they are also increasingly targeted by the philanthropy class for private investment purposes through the legal-economic incentives proposed by social entrepreneurship and social impact bonds. This return on investment logic is a driving force in the expansion of fundraising activities and development departments within art institutions and cultural organizations, which work closely with individual patrons and their foundations that structure financial giving.

 

While the number of private foundations in Germany is growing, charitable contributions are being made by a shrinking number of supporters.[1] With less people giving more money, charitable purposes in Germany are increasingly defined by a very select few under less transparent governance arrangements. Under threat of state budget cuts, an urgent question today for the art sector in Germany and beyond (i.e. in France, where Barto lives and works), is whether the model of tax privileged private philanthropy and its entrepreneurial approaches to fundraising for art become an increasingly expected substitute for state governmental public support such as grants. How will funding for art be altered by the increased expectation of privately contributed income and revenue streams? And ultimately, what are the circumstances of socioeconomic injustice which make the model of privately governed patronage and philanthropy seem necessary?

 

Grants, donations, and sponsorship are a response to funding requests and fundraising efforts. Art institutions are at the forefront of establishing neoliberal philanthropy and entrepreneurial fundraising as the means for responding to socioeconomic necessity. While the emphasis is most often on distinguishing between modes of arts funding like grants, donations, and sponsorship, these different modes of art funding in fact share many of the same operative functions. Grantors, donors, and sponsors alike, stipulate conditions and directives in providing funds, requiring the funding recipient to report on outcomes that meet certain metrics, and which the funders have built into their funding arrangement in order for outcomes to be gauged according to criteria of success they have established. Particularly in the art sector, distinctions between these forms of funding are increasingly unclear, which is why gift classification policy has become more complex in recent years. From a legal standpoint, the distinctions between these systems of financial support for the arts center around the statutes, implications, and effects of tax treatment, charitable purposes, and related compensation. But the legal classification of financial giving in the art sector raises crucial questions that remain unsettled. For instance, German law clearly stipulates that donations are gifts—a specific legally defined form of financial giving that prohibits the donor from receiving any form of compensation or recoupment on their donation, save for the allotted tax deduction. Yet there remain open-ended questions about the potential for eventual compensation on donations when those very donations are used to fund the production of artworks that are destined for private holding (the vast majority of artworks as legal property are of course destined for private holding).

 

In preparing her exhibition The Supporters for the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Barto reexamined this current problem field within the German art context, and considered specific—distinct yet interrelated, and often overlapping—forms of financial support, namely: grants, donations, and sponsorship. The different sources that fund Barto’s exhibition were actively pursued by the artist as necessary means of production, and as a deliberately comparable set of relations. Working with the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Barto secured a grant for her exhibition from the regional German government of Baden-Württemberg, where Stuttgart is located. This grant from the regional government’s granting agency for arts and culture is particularly meaningful when considering how the statutes of state funding and charitable uses expand as new public needs develop. The grant, titled, “Art Despite Distance/Kunst Trotz Abstand,” was made available as a direct response to the needs of artists and their institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to emphasizing artist fees and underwriting material production, the grant made certain funds available for infrastructural materials that supported public health needs and guidelines. Barto utilizes the full allocation from the grant for this intended purpose of equipping the institution with materials that support public health in face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Barto then necessarily supplemented this grant, and matching funds provided by the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart from its core budget that derives from the City of Stuttgart, with a donation from Galerie Max Mayer, a commercial gallery owned and operated by Max Mayer in Düsseldorf, Germany.

 

Finally, Barto secured an additional working relationship to amplify and extend further the comparable forms of financial giving and receiving localized within her exhibition at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. The artist proposed that her exhibition in Stuttgart be mirrored by an exhibition of her work at the Kunstverein Nürnberg—an exhibiting institution, which in comparison to the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, is more reliant on fundraising from third-party sources. While Barto’s exhibition at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is almost entirely supported through city and regional government funding, the artist’s exhibition at the Kunstverein Nürnberg, also entitled The Supporters, is largely made possible through financial sponsorship from Galerie Max Mayer. Galerie Max Mayer’s donation to the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart prohibits any direct compensation beyond the permissible tax deduction, yet the gallery’s sponsorship provided to Kunstverein Nürnberg is far less restrictive in how compensations are regulated. The complex circuit of comparative interrelations that Barto has orchestrated between these art institutions is formalized through a system of legal contracts that govern the different forms of financial giving and effects. The contractual agreements are included in both exhibitions as an unlimited edition work by Barto, which the artist has made freely distributable to anyone visiting the exhibitions.

 

The Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is pleased to present “The Supporters”, a project by Eva Barto produced in collaboration with the Kunstverein Nürnberg and Galerie Max Mayer, Düsseldorf.

 

[1] Council on Foundations Report, “Non-Profit Law in Germany” (March 2020). European Fundraising Association, “Growing Philanthropy in Germany”, https://efa-net.eu/features/your-voice-growing-philanthropy-in-germany (last accessed March 2021).

 

2021 27.03.–25.07.2021
Unusability Might be Assumed Unless There are Signs Indicating Otherwise
Ramaya Tegegne
Exhibition
27.03.–25.07.2021
Program:
Sun, 25.07.2021
15:00 o’clock

Please note: due to public health requirements, the exhibition is closed until further notice. Künstlerhaus Stuttgart will send a follow up announcement as soon as the exhibition space reopens. Please consult with the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart website for updated information.

Ramaya Tegegne’s exhibition at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart centers around the artist’s experiential research into the conflicting role art institutions maintain when they promote claims to anti-racism while actively engaging in the management of racial inequalities. It is this violent disconnect between a declarative politics and the actualized material politics that Tegegne recognizes as being particularly pervasive in the arts sector. This disconnect is amplified today by a social uprising that extends from the racial equity demands of individual access and representation to transforming race relations at the systemic level of shared policy and institutional governance. While considering the extent to which racially specific elision and dispossession continue to define the operative structures of art institutions, Tegegne’s exhibition emphasizes how everyday lived relations are directly responsive to these deeply entrenched ongoing historical conditions.

 

Within her exhibition at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Tegegne’s new film work, Framer Framed[1], presents a deliberation by the board of directors of an unnamed cultural institution in French-speaking Switzerland. This fictional staged board meeting revisits an actual incident that took place in 2019 when a group of Black migrant men were forced to vacate the lobby of a Swiss state-funded cultural institution, which at the time was screening a film about the exclusion and discrimination of Black migrant men in Switzerland. These individuals gathered in the lobby were told to leave by a management employee of the institution who justified the expulsion by stating that the group was loitering and disrupting the experience of patrons attending the screening. For Tegegne, this incident must be recognized within a far-reaching history of loitering and vagrancy laws directed against Black people, as well as the broader history of racialized policing of property and public space. Framer Framed was produced in response to this particular incident, which Tegegne witnessed first-hand, and intervened in by first confronting the employee, and then addressing the institution’s board through a collectively-organized letter writing campaign. Because the institution provided no substantive reply to these modes of address, nor any inclusive means for deliberation on appropriate recourse or retribution, Tegegne sought other means by which to hold a hearing on the facts of the matter.

 

The scripted, staged, and performed deliberations in Framer Framed enact a place for governance arrangements, adjudication, and dispute resolution as wrested from the continued historical realities of institutional proceedings that define property rights and property relations through racialized expulsion and dispossession. In doing so, Tegegne’s film embodies a collective experience of joy, solidarity, and defiance, while it also evidences a painful outcome: a substantive deliberation on racial justice conducted by the institutional governing board was ultimately realized as fiction, solely as artistic content. And this painful outcome—consistent with an oppressive system of reality that relegates recourse for BIPOC wholly within the realm of expression—is reached by way of a cunning deception which Tegegne recognizes as a unique operative function of the artistic field. In her letter writing campaign, Tegegne had asked the organizer of the screening that presented a film about the exclusion and discrimination of black migrant men in Switzerland, and the board of the hosting institution, to advocate for and implement specific anti-racist policies. That the institution in question was unresponsive to these policy demands, while presenting and promoting artistic content that evokes these very demands, is exemplary of how art institutions prevent structural transformation by dissociating artistic content from its social conditions of production, distribution, and reception. What is the role of art institutions and cultural organizations when their own claims for racial equity are ultimately rendered as purely content-related? What are artists as content producers to do when institutional conduct is in direct conflict with the values expressed by their artistic content? What methods and techniques might artists utilize to more fully align their symbolic, affective, sensorial interventions, and the structures that govern these artistic interventions?

 

Framer Framed draws from the reflexive, situationally-specific, and interventionist theater methodologies that the noted Brazilian playwrite, dramaturgist, and educator, Augusto Boal developed in the 1950s and 1960s from Black Experimental Theater traditions in New York, and during his years organizing forum theatre productions at the Teatro de Arena de São Paulo in Brazil. Boal’s forum theatre productions worked to bring underserved local community constituents into the space of theater in order to roleplay and workshop advocacy and policy goals for their communities. Tegegne cast Black-identifying filmmakers and actors living and working in the French-speaking Swiss context, including one individual who was directly involved in the 2019 incident, to perform the staged deliberations that were filmed for Framer Framed. Another forum theatre method that Tegegne’s film utilizes is having scripted performances interjected with unscripted input and feedback by performers and set production workers as the deliberations play out on set. At one crucial point, the performers and set production workers begin having an entirely unscripted discussion on camera about their reasons for agreeing to work on the film, as well as discussing what the fictional staged board deliberations convey about the field of artistic production. While satire is a prevalent motif within the scripted performances, it was important for Tegegne to corroborate the disaffection and unmediated actual lived relations that worked together to produce Framer Framed. Additionally, in producing the film, Tegegne was intent on extending the political imperatives expressed within Framer Framed, to an inquiry of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart as the institutional context for its reception and for her exhibition at large.

 

In preparing Unusability Might be Assumed Unless there are Signs Indicating Otherwise[2], Tegegne conducted a study of the exhibition history of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, and implemented a particular legal-economic structure through which to manage the means of production for her exhibition. Tegegne is the first Black artist to produce a major monographic exhibition for the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart since its founding in 1978. This historical reality informs a number of the artist’s decisions about the spatial logic and use of the exhibition gallery where her work is situated. Constructing a barrier made from semi-transparent theater curtains, Tegegne has sectioned-off most of the gallery, rendering the exhibition space largely inaccessible to visitors and veiling any possibility to see out onto the space. The artist’s ambivalence in considering how to make use of a space that has not evolved to be usable for her is expressed throughout the exhibition. There is the opacity and transparency of the constructed barrier. The unoccupied space is confrontationally off-limits, but also softened by the semi-transparent fabric acting as an optical filter—a clear obstruction and soft-focus lens all at once. And there is the intimate space Tegegne constructed for viewing the film—welcoming, open, and snug, but also set aside and withdrawn. Beyond the symbolic, affective, and sensorial encounter generated by the theater curtain structure, Tegegne reconsidered the usability of the economic conditions typically arranged by an exhibiting institution. In preparing for her exhibition the artist founded a Verein (e.V./Association), a registered association that governs her work according to association law and provides the artist with greater direct control over how the financing of her exhibition is managed. For instance, rather than the hosting institution managing third-party funds raised for Tegegne’s exhibition, these funds are directly wired to her Verein. And through this legal-economic structure, the artist allocates funds for her own needs and the needs of workers she hires, bypassing the mediatory influence—the oversight and reporting—that is typically centralized within the fiduciary responsibilities of the hosting institution. Consequently, Tegegne’s exhibition at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart mobilizes a critical ambivalence towards the usability of established and inherited art institutions, by more fully realizing how artistic interests must be inextricably bound to their determining material conditions.[3]

 

[1] Tegegne takes this title for her film from: Trinh T. Minh-ha, Framer Framed, Routledge, 1993
[2] Tegegne draws inspiration for this exhibition title from Sara Ahmed’s writings, specifically: Sara Ahmed, What’s the Use? On the Uses of Use, Duke University Press, 2019, p. 57
[3] Ambivalence is a critical position-taking, not a passive state of contradiction. It must be recognized that “ambivalence,” and interpretations of “Black ambivalence” have been articulated by scholarship within Black Studies, and Black radical traditions more broadly. Please see for instance the concept of “Double Consciousness,” often associated with William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, who introduced the term into social and political thought, most notably in his groundbreaking, The Souls of Black Folk (1903). The criticality of “ambivalence” has also been discussed within intersectional and Black feminist writings which seek to disrupt fixity and oppressive dichotomies that have historically impeded the intersectional work of forming feminist alliances.

 

 

 

Ramaya Tegegne, 2021
2021 25.03.2021
Relaunch: The New Künstlerhaus Stuttgart Website Goes Online
News
25.03.2021

As the intersection between internationally renowned exhibition programs, Stuttgart’s community of artists, and important local discussions, the Künstlerhaus is taking on an increasingly important role. Now, this significance is also reflected in a brand-new website. Following an intensive working process, www.kuenstlerhaus.de goes online today with its new design and clear structure.

The new online presence is based on visitor-friendliness, transparency, and the presentation of all content through a new navigation system and a clear design.
The idea for the new website was to present the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart in its entirety directly on the homepage, to create a structure that made it possible to find information easily, and to present activities in our workshops and studios on an equal footing with the exhibition program.
The Stuttgart office matter of was responsible for the design, and Valentin Alisch for the technical implementation. The project was led by Managing Director Romy Range, who was supported by the board during the realization.

 

Transparency and Clarity

All areas of the Künstlerhaus are now placed on an equal footing alongside one another, directly visible to users. Whether it’s a matter of exhibitions, workshops, studio fellowships, or memberships for the Künstlerhaus, everything can be found in one glance and accessed directly via the navigation system. The tiled images on the homepage also enable intuitive access to the individual menu options, such as exhibitions, studios, or workshops. Moreover, the agenda provides an overview of all upcoming events and exhibitions. All content will also continue to be available in both German and English.

 

New Menu Options, New Content

We have not only restructured the existing content but also brought opportunities for participation more prominently to the fore with the Education and Membership categories. For example, in the area of Education, our project with the Hölderlin-Gymnasium will also become visible in the coming months.
In our new shop, editions and publications are now available for purchase, and purchases can be processed via the website. Memberships can also now be set up online, which simplifies the process for all users.
Furthermore, what is also new is the website’s function as a comprehensive research tool with filter options. It provides different users with the opportunity to delve into a multitude of particular topics and to search for content.

 

Clear and Simple Design

Fresh colors, lots of white space, large-format images, and embedded videos: the newly designed website provides users with all important information in a single glance. Each subpage offers an entry point via images and videos, followed by longer texts.
Hence our workshops, for example, can be experienced not only through images but also videos. In the coming months, each workshop and its special features will be presented in a short film. The first to be shown will be for the ceramics, silkscreen, and etching workshops.

 

Archive from 40 Years of the Künstlerhaus

In our archive, there are more than 40 years of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to explore. In order to make research easier for visitors, we have built in search and filter functions, so that one can research specific exhibitions, events, publications, and the like. We have processed archival material, researched visual materials, and generated new content. The archive is therefore a continual work-in-progress. In the coming months, we will continue to supplement it with further content.

 

With this new website, all the different facets of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart shall be available to experience, and users will be informed about all our activities in the best possible way.

2021 22.03.2021
Studio scholarships 2021/22
News
Studios
22.03.2021
The new studio holders move into their studios on May 01

Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is pleased to announce the new studio holders for the year 2021/22, who will move into their studios at Künstlerhaus starting May 01, 2021. This year, the Künstlerhaus is once again able to provide six outstanding artists, artist groups and collectives with working spaces for one year.
We are pleased to welcome Helen Weber and Janis Eckhardt as new fellows.
The grants of Alba Frenzel, Lennart Cleemann and Marlon Lanziner and Valentino Biagio (MAVA) have been extended for another year. Jasmin Schädler will share her studio with her colleagues of the n.n.n. collective Susanne Brendel and Julia Schäfer in her last year as a studio holder.

 

Janis Eckhardt

Janis Eckhardt’s (*1994) working method combines personal fascinations with contemporary social circumstances through the lens of constellations and objects. His works are mostly the result of a casual momentum that emerges from these accumulated materials. Performative aspects as well as the reutilization of his own and other material—plus its history, distribution and recontextualization—are the mechanisms running through his work. He is consequently always in search of a form of reproduction and representation that is not merely symbolic but rather an intervention that produces and perpetuates ambiguity.

 

Helen Weber

Helen Weber (*1994) studied fine arts in Stuttgart and Istanbul. She works individually and collectively between interior and exterior space, and is part of the Schwäbischer Online-Albverein, kollektiv_mitteperformance, and ROSANNAWIDUKIND. Weber throws herself into different contexts with a field-research approach, resulting in actions, sculptures, texts, video installations and various forms of documentation. For some time now, she has been interested in the contradictions of the “German Forest,” an ideological playground between survival, woodland solitude*, folklore, protest, ticks, nature and climate protection.
*In July 2020, the “Black Forest Rambo” Y. Rausch disarmed four police officers during a call-out to his garden hut and subsequently found shelter from police helicopters in his native Black Forest during a six-day manhunt. In a video, a local resident describes the situation: “I was busy in the garden and on my way down I was looking along the street—because you just kind of glance around then for a moment—when I saw a young man in camouflage walking down the street with a long walking stick. He was walking like a hiker.”

 

n.n.n. collective

n.n.n. collective was founded by Jasmin Schädler, Julia Schäfer, and Susanne Brendel in 2014. Schädler studied theater directing at the Akademie für Darstellende Kunst Baden-Württemberg (2016) and art praxis at the Dutch Art Institute (2019). Schäfer graduated with a degree in fine arts from the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste Stuttgart (2020) and Brendel studied stage and costume design and visual arts at the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste Stuttgart (2021). Together, they develop formats grounded in both the visual and performing arts. Their content engages with literary and theoretical texts in equal measure as well as their potential to activate scenic processes. Their works have been shown in venues including the project space at the Kunstverein Wagenhalle, the Schauspiel Stuttgart, and the Theater Rampe. With the aid of a publication grant from the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts of Baden-Württemberg, their book vom Aufgang der Sonne (From the Rising of the Sun) will be released in 2021. It will present texts and artistic works within the context of a critical examination of Hegel’s lectures on the philosophy of world history.

 

Eva Dörr & Lena Meinhardt

Lena Meinhardt and Eva Dörr have been working together as an artist duo since 2019. Their works meet in the field of sound installation.

Lena Meinhardt was a contact student in computer music at the Stuttgart University of Music and Performing Arts. She is currently studying audiovisual media at the HdM Stuttgart. In her compositions, recordings of places, objects or texts take on a life of their own through powerful syntheses of sound. Together with Eva Dörr, who studied fine arts and mathematics at KIT Karlsruhe and the State Academy of Fine Arts Stuttgart, among others, she creates location- or context-related works. Eva Dörr’s artistic focus is on (sound) installation and video. She focuses on the acoustic perception of mostly marginal spaces and places.

The work ABELKA is part of the self-organized exhibition project “Kehrmaschine”. Synchronized with other works in the exhibition, the 8-channel sound installation mixes the hall’s ventilation system with a 60-minute composition that takes spatial memory as its theme, filling the hall with sounds and their reflections.

 

Alba Frenzel

Alba Frenzel studied at the Academy of Visual Arts in Leipzig. During her studies, she focused on photography in the field of contemporary art. After receiving her diploma in the summer of 2017, she exhibited her work Fotopapier, Licht, Ei together with other prize winners as part of the photography competition gute aussichten – junge deutsche fotografie at the Deichtorhallen Hamburg. In spring 2021 her first publication Kreatur o.T. will be published by Vexer Verlag.
In her artistic-research work, she is interested in how “living art” is created. In her current research, she came across “liverwurst tree” by chance, which is on the same page as “life” in the Duden dictionary. “My work is large-scale research, dealing with the liverwurst tree as if it were art, or with art as if it were a liverwurst tree. The qualities that can be metaphysically rethought to the properties of art are selected in the process.
The heterogeneous material I have collected on the tree, originally native to West Africa, comes from a variety of found sources: Images, catalog texts, videos, professional essays, and internet search results.”

 

Lennart Cleemann

Lennart Cleemann (*1990) has a background in architecture. He studied in Hanover, Aarhus and Stuttgart. Before joining the Kunsthochschule in Stuttgart, he did an internship at Buchner Bründler Architekten in Basel (Switzerland). This time shaped his way of thinking and working attitude regarding what he calls “poetic pragmatism”. It was in Reto Boller’s art class that he discovered his affinity for direct contact with material and its emotional potency.

His work deals primarily with themes of oneness and togetherness, as well as themes of sexual desire and consumption. Liberation from a felt helplessness in the face of socially and intellectually entrenched structures is a goal of his work. He has an affinity for raw, untreated materials, which are often the starting point of his work. These are often combined with found objects from the street and construction sites and put into context with each other.

He applied to Künstlerhaus Stuttgart with the intention of using the studio provided as a test space for installations, in the sense of a dystopian apartment. The idea stems primarily from his exploration of the motif of the bed as a place of retreat, lethargy, but also intimacy and joy.

He explores emotional and relational contexts that occupy him in his everyday life. The test room can also be seen as a kind of construction site that is in constant flux. Life and death, beauty, destruction and decay have an equal right to exist here.

 

Marlon Lanziner und Valentino Biagio (MAVA)

As the artist group MAVA, Marlon Lanziner and Valentino Biagio have been working on the sculptural elaboration of environmental phenomenasince 2014. In their project the rain brings the color, they demonstrate how copper’s weathering processes create streaks of color on a white marble staircase as it reacts with rainwater and how this transforms the staircase’s appearance.

Marlon Lanziner (born 1989) and Valentino Biagio (born 1988) studied fine arts at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Stuttgart from 2010 to 2018.

In 2019 Marlon Lanziner designed the first edition of miniature Vadonna sculptures with Eva-Marie Holzner. The unique, individually colored bronze sculptures refer on the one hand to the classic representation of the Virgin Mary as the Madonna, and on the other to the female sex. The sculptures unite both of these aspects.

In 2020 Marlon Lanziner and Valentino Berndt published the MAVA art book The Speed of the Earth, which summarizes the artistic projects from 2014 – 2020. In the following year 2021 they plan to publish the book in the context of an exhibition.

Within the framework of the studio program, scholarships are awarded to outstanding artists and applicants from the fields of architecture and theory. They are provided with a working space in the Künstlerhaus free of charge. In addition, the workshops of the Künstlerhaus can be used free of charge. The workspaces are awarded annually on the basis of the applications received. The decision on the allocation is made by the advisory board of the Künstlerhaus. This year, the start of the scholarship is May 1, 2021 due to corona. The jury consisted of representatives of the board of directors and the advisory board of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart e.V.

 

Helen Weber, RAMBO 2020, photo: Julia Schäfer
© n.n.n. collective
Eva Dörr & Lena Meinhardt, ABELKA, photo: Eva Dörr & Lena Meinhardt
Lennart Cleemann, My Dear Friends (One of Them is a Dramaqueen), garden chairs, dimensions variable, 2020
MAVA studio, photo: MAVA
Alba Frenzel
2021 09.03.2021
Tuesday Workshop V
Ülkü Süngün
Events
Discussion
09.03.2021
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

Ülkü Süngün

studied sculpture at the State Academy of Fine Arts. Using various media such as photography, installation, sculpture and lecture performances, she critically examines migration and identity (politics) and memory in her work and conducts artistic research with her process-oriented and collaborative approaches. As a lecturer at the Merz Academy and the State Academy of Fine Arts in Stuttgart, she also dealt with emancipatory issues in teaching. In the Künstlerhaus she realizes her project Institute for Artistic Migration Research (IKMF). With her association, founded in 2017, she makes her previous artistic and socio-critical practice structurally visible and uses spaces nomadically. In spring 2019, the ACTIVIST ACADEMY. VISUAL STRATEGIES I realized with several open workshops in the Künstlerhaus. In 2019 she had a stay with the IKMF during the zeitraumexit in Mannheim: GEMEINGUT JUNGBUSCH. In the Jungbusch district, she examined the functions of migration and cultural institutions in the context of gentrification. Stations of the stay were the short film series KANAKINO with Belit Sag and Cana Bilir-Meier.

 

___

 

Tuesday Workshop

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc., and is open to everyone!

The new format was initiated by Ronald Kolb and is supported by the Künstlerhaus advisory board.

2021 09.02.2021
Tuesday Workshop IV
Florian Model
Events
Discussion
09.02.2021
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

Florian Model

meanders between curatorial and artistic practice and explores the influence of technological developments on societal processes and structures by simulating the outcomes of these complex systems. He runs the nomadic non-profit organization Anorak e. V. together with Johanna Markert and Lukas Ludwig. Recent group exhibitions include MADE IN CHINA at the MAB Society, Shanghai (2013); Soft Nepotism at the Bar Du Bois, Vienna (2014); Expectations at the Composing Rooms, Berlin (2015); Zunfthaus der Künstler at Cabaret Voltaire, Zürich; and the route of friendship runs into a big beautiful wall at the Ladrón Gallery, Mexico City (2018).

___

 

Tuesday Workshop

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc., and is open to everyone!

The new format was initiated by Ronald Kolb and is supported by the Künstlerhaus advisory board.

2021 08.02.2021
Alliance for equitable arts and cultural work, Baden-Württemberg
News
08.02.2021

Statement

 

We, active practitioners and institutions in the field of art, working in Baden-Württemberg, came together on June 12th 2020 to form an open, independent, and interdisciplinary alliance for equitable and inclusive conditions in the arts and cultural sector. This alliance will actively bring about systemic changes on a regional, national, and trans-national level.

 

What motivates us is the concern for the future of the arts, and the conviction that the arts sector can only remain independent if the structural conditions change radically, for cultural workers and the field at large.[1]

 

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has yet again highlighted the deeply precarious and unequal conditions within the arts and cultural sector. These concerns are amplified by a sector founded on the (self-) exploitation of working people, that is, both freelance workers, as well as those employed by institutions. Discrimination based on social and ethnic origins, race, age, gender, ability, or the responsibilities of child care remains a pervasive problem in the arts and cultural sector. The current conditions do not allow most of those concerned to build up savings or other securities, and in particular limit the scope for action of underserved individuals and communities.

 

Since the 1980’s, that is to say, since the onset of neoliberalism, publicly funded arts and cultural institutions have been under political pressure to systematically align with economic criteria, and be tailored to the model of private companies. The result has been, and continues to be, a massive reduction in permanent positions, the commercialization of public institutions, and the mandated focus on quantity, especially in terms of visitor numbers. This quantifiable product and commercial production-oriented logic has proven completely untenable under the stresses imposed by the corona pandemic.

Many independent associations and organizations already work beyond institutional funding, i.e. on the basis of voluntary work and unsecured project funding, without long-term prospects.

Competition, attention, and winner-take-all principles overdetermining factors in the arts and cultural sector, and are often the only criteria of “success”. For the vast majority of artists, the lack of basic necessities and secure income, affordable studios, storage or rehearsal spaces continue to be an existential issue. This, and other imbalances, create questionable competition for resources that are mostly based on non-transparent accessibility. The first to fall by the wayside are various disadvantaged people.

 

Due to the structures mentioned, and the pandemic scenario of reinforcement of exclusions and hierarchization (“market cleansing”), this current situation urgently needs to be counteracted. It is important to ensure that “high culture” and socio-culture, large stages and independent theatres, museums and artist co-operative galleries, institutions as well as international and local artists are not being pitted against each other. The cultural landscape must remain diverse and complex.

The numerous aid and emergency programs, which are currently being laid out – especially in Baden-Württemberg – for workers and institutions in the field of the arts, are an encouraging sign that politicians are aware of the importance, concerns and needs of the arts—and this gives rise to hope for a common solidarity, in face of the current crisis and also after having overcome it.

 

However, the closure of all arts and cultural institutions while private businesses remain open, regardless of existing health and safety measures, in the so-called ‘lockdown light’, has painfully demonstrated that the social importance of the arts is still not fully recognized by some parts of politics. This demonstrates clearly that the arts, not just in times of crisis, clearly lag behind economic interests. It is highly problematic and we do not understand why moreover, with the second lockdown, they were denied any educational work.

We are highly concerned that the many aid packages will be followed by budget restructuring which would hit the arts with great severity. This would mean that we would fall even further behind the current inadequate funding policies. This requires new approaches and structures that go beyond the current crisis and give long-term security to the independence of the arts and their emancipatory potential.

For the absolutely necessary change in the arts and cultural sector, the existing funding policies and working practices must be fundamentally questioned and re-organized with the participation of the active protagonists from the arts, politics and administration. The financial basis for transparent and fair, diverse and inclusive (working) conditions must be created, instead of continuing to rely on the (self-) exploitation of arts and cultural workers and the structural deficits of public institutions. This means we need funding models which are based on long-term radical equality of institutions and artists which – for example, in their role as applicants – guarantee and allow adequate and binding payment for everyone working in the arts and cultural sector: for artists, as well as freelancing or employed curators, dramaturges, cultural producers, mediators, graphic designers, technical teams, mask, stage and costume designers, restaurators, assistants, interns, authors, translators, cashiers, security and cleaning staff, journalists and many more. This is impossible under the given funding conditions.

The sum that the federal, state and local authorities in Germany spend annually on culture is 11.4 billion euros, which represents merely 1.77% of the federal budget and 0.35% of GDP.[2] This is an extremely low percentage. In the European comparison, in terms of cultural expenditure of the total public budget [3] Germany ranks 15th, together with France, Slovakia, Romania and Finland. In the comparisons within the federal states, Baden-Württemberg ranks 8th in terms of cultural expenditure (states and municipalities) per inhabitant with 114.64 euros, just below the average and far behind Saxony (212.95 euros) in 8th place [4] (all figures: as of 2017).

As the figures above show, a significant increase in public funding for arts and culture in Germany, in general, and in Baden-Württemberg, in particular, is absolutely necessary. Furthermore, there is an urgent need for a transparent and participatory discussion about the existing allocation, between all parties involved. The promotion of culture must finally be declared a mandatory task of the state. This is the only way to counteract, in a binding and sustainable manner, the precarious working conditions in the cultural sector, in which around 1.3 million people are employed – almost 40% of them as freelancers (as of 2017).[5]

 

As an extension to existing forums, we want to be competent, critical advisory partners working closely with municipal, federal and national authorities, to help shape solutions, to bring demands and suggestions into budget negotiations, and to approach the political systems. It is only together that we can establish alternative structures, accurately analyze, and eliminate the systemic errors, which have arisen and stabilized over decades, in cultural policy and cultural financing.

In addition to the concern of helping to shape the necessary changes of the existing cultural-political structures through our knowledge, experience, criticism and creativity, it is equally important to us to put ourselves to the test, through developing our own working, thinking and decision-making methods concerning an equitable, diverse and inclusive arts and cultural sector. How are the institutions and active protagonists set up in our alliance, how transparent and democratic are their decision-making processes? How critical of discrimination and sensitive are their actual working practices? Last but not least, we also have to ask ourselves what functions and responsibilities public arts and cultural institutions have, in an immigration country, in terms of social imbalances, growing nationalism, right-wing radicalism, digital surveillance and the climate crisis. How do we deal with (self-) censorship and sexualised violence within the arts and cultural sector?

 

These questions can only be negotiated from multi-perspective points of view and in collective processes. There is as much to unlearn as there is to learn anew. In this sense, how can already existing resources and opportunities be used more cooperatively and in solidarity?

 

Our alliance is not only concerned with the old and new, pandemic related problems in the arts. It also asserts itself for strong systemic changes which think the arts in solidarity with other areas of society. We are concerned with a cultural, social and political change that does not follow the principle of the strongest but makes vulnerability its starting point.

This new alliance is open and currently incomplete. We are looking forward to many more participants from different fields and contexts of the arts.

 

More information: www.dasbuendnis.net

 

[1] For us, the term “art and cultural workers” includes all freelancers and employees in the arts and cultural sector: from artists, curators and dramaturges to security and cleaning services.

[2] from: Statistische Ämter des Bundes und der Länder (ed.), Cultural Financial Report 2020, 2020, p. 19-20. The 2017 public cultural expenditure on which this is based relate to the fields of theatre and music (34.5%), museums, collections and exhibitions (19.1%), libraries (14.1%), cultural affairs abroad (6%), public art colleges (5.1%), monument protection and preservation (5%), administration (2.5%) and other (13.8%). See: https://www.destatis.de/DE/Themen/Gesellschaft-Umwelt/Bildung-Forschung-Kultur/Kultur/Publikationen/Downloads-Kultur/kulturfinanzbericht-1023002209004.pdf (last accessed on 8.1.2021).

[3] from: European Union (ed.), Culture Statistics. 2019 Edition, 2019, p. 194. The comparison between European Union countries published here refers to expenditure on culture, broadcasting and publishing. See: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/de/web/products-statistical-books/-/ks-01-19-712  (last accessed on 8.1.2021).
[4] from: Cultural Finance Report 2020, as note 2, p. 24.

[5] [from: Statistische Ämter des Bundes und der Länder, press release no. 145, 22 April 2020. Occupations in the cultural sector are very broadly defined here and range from “technical media design” to “acting, dance and the arts of movement” and “teaching activities in extracurricular educational institutions” to “museum technicians and management”. It is not possible to identify who is working in the more commercial or more subsidised sector in the various categories used here. At the same time, it can be assumed that many who work in the publicly funded arts sector are not included here: such as security and cleaning staff. See: https://www.destatis.de/DE/Presse/Pressemitteilungen/2020/04/PD20_145_216.html(last accessed on 8.1.2021).

2021 12.01.2021
Tuesday Workshop III
Damaris Wurster
Events
Discussion
12.01.2021
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

Damaris Wurster

is a visual artist, freelance editor and writer. She studied at the Merz Academy and the State Academy of Fine Arts Stuttgart.
In her work she deals with the abstraction of photography and digital compositions. The starting materials are analog film material, digital photographs and found footage. In addition to her artistic work, she works as an editor with a focus on media art.
In 2016 she founded the Lowland Magazine and the exhibition project of the same name together with Anne Pflug and Christiana Teufel. The project aims to promote networking among artists from different disciplines.

 

___

 

Tuesday Workshop

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc., and is open to everyone!

The new format was initiated by Ronald Kolb and is supported by the Künstlerhaus advisory board.

2020 08.12.2020
Tuesday Workshop II
Jasmin Schädler
Events
Discussion
08.12.2020
Neues Diskussionsformat des Künstlerhaus Stuttgart
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

Jasmin Schädler

is a director and visual artist. After her bachelor’s degree in physics and cultural studies, she studied theater directing under Christof Nel at the Akademie für Darstellende Kunst Baden-Württemberg and completed a master’s degree in art practice at the Dutch Art Institute. Her artistic focus lies in the dissection of contexts and etymologies. Technology and perception are currently at the center of her work. One long-term artistic research project is her work on the interaction between humans and algorithms. She recently presented a lecture performance on this topic at Silent Green (Berlin) in May 2019.
In 2020 she is creating a work with Bongile Gorata Lecoge-Zulu for the festival Die irritierte Stadt that explores the performative diversity of the perception of urban space. As part of the collective die apokalyptischen tänzer*innen (www.apocalypse.dance) she develops performances in close collaboration with Theater Rampe and as part of Freischwimmen, a platform for new talent.

___

 

Tuesday Workshop

 

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc., and is open to everyone!

The new format was initiated by Ronald Kolb and is supported by the Künstlerhaus advisory board.

2020 13.10.2020
Tuesday Workshop
Nana Hülsewig & Fender Schrade (NAF)
Events
Discussion
13.10.2020
Curated by:
Ronald Kolb

NAF

are the two artists Nana Hülsewig and Fender Schrade. Their collaboration began in 2013 at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. Since then they have been working consistently on an aesthetic of transgression in the areas of pop music, theater and the visual arts. In 2019, they were awarded the Baden-Württemberg Dance and Theater Prize for the second time for their stage work. In June 2015 they received the three-year conceptual funding from the state of Baden-Württemberg for their project series “NORM IS F! KTION”. Since 2018, NAF has expanded its duo with international artists with its project “DIE WERKSTATT” and developed artistic working methods, their instruments and their compositions as a collective. The Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst Leipzig and the Theater Rampe Stuttgart are close allies.

__

 

Tuesday Workshop

 

From October 2020, artists and other cultural workers will meet every second Tuesday of the month at 7 pm at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart to present their artistic practice, exchange and discuss ideas, and get to know each other better.

The Künstlerhaus invites an artist or a collective—meaning any artists or cultural workers from any field or discipline—to talk about their working methods as well as their backgrounds and approaches. We want to establish a platform for a more in-depth interaction with regard to artistic practice, and in doing so to create a network, show solidarity, and mutually strengthen one other.

The series is aimed at all members of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, artists either living in Stuttgart and the surrounding area or just traveling through, all cultural workers, art mediators, curators, etc. and is open to everyone!

NAF, NORM IST F!KTION #5/1, 2020, photo: Regina Brocke
2020 15.03.–19.12.2020
Working Groups
Exhibition
Curated by:
Eric Golo Stone

Künstlerhaus educators lead public discussions of the exhibition: Saturdays / Sundays 12–6pm

It is widely known that the field of art has become particularly indicative of the political economy. We recognize the kind ofdamage that art fully participates in now. Plutocratic governance arrangements and wealth management strategies increasingly define the operational structures of art institutions. Artworld sites of production, distribution, education, reception, and consumption are entirely synonymous with socioeconomic inequality. Artists are a frequently cited example of how laborers are exploited, dispossessed, and deprived when working in a hyper-atomized industry dominated by asymmetrical property laws, freelance contracts, non-disclosure agreements, and verbal offers.

 

How do we intervene in the consequential legal-economic structures that govern immediate lived relations and working conditions in the field of art? How do we reconcile the unbearable disconnect between the declarative politics that works of art invoke, and the actual political realities that produce and distribute works of art?

 

Working Group Series

The exhibition, Working Groups, at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart initiates a two-year long series of closed-door working groups to engage in a substantive reconsideration of the institutional governance arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, and labor relations that produce and distribute art. Comprised of local, regional, and international constituencies, these working groups will conceptualize and implement policies, contracts, and bylaws specific to the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. In addition to directly addressing the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart as a responsive institutional case study, this working group series offers a model of collaborative governance while supporting experiential research into shared policy.

 

Founded by artists in 1978, the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is an institutional context that is structurally equipped for reconsiderations of governance and policy-making from the perspective of art practitioners. It is an art institution constituted by the legal-economic structures of association law in Germany, with bylaws that stipulate association members’ voting rights in governing the institution. In addition to the agency that comes with maintaining voting rights in a typical kunstverein structure, association members of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart—the large majority of members being artists or practitioners who maintain artistic criteria at the core of their work—also oversee numerous production facilities, workshops, and studios located onsite in the same building that houses exhibition galleries and administrative offices. Consequently, artists occupy a position that closely interrelates institutional governance and the immediate conditions of production at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

By emphasizing artists as primary constituents who conceptualize and implement institutional policy governing conditions in the field of art, this series of closed-door working groups at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart challenges the settled expectation that artists’ work necessarily amounts to purely content-related outcomes for consumption. Working Groups also then reconsiders to what extent exhibiting art institutions can resist the attention economy and its current demand for consumable content by recognizing and valuing the work artists do that is not intended for consumption. Indeed, how can artists and their institutions fully realize the actual lived conditions that produce and distribute art as being inextricably bound to the symbolic, sensorial, and affective systems of artworks themselves?

 

The Services Working Group Video Document

The exhibition component of Working Groups at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart presents the complete archive of videos documenting a historical closed-door working group on labor relations and institutional governance in the art field, which took place on January 22 and 23, 1994 at the Kunstraum of the University of Lüneburg, a non-collecting university art gallery in Lüneburg, Germany (now Kunstraum Leuphana University of Lüneburg). The art historian and curator, Helmut Draxler, and the artist, Andrea Fraser, organized this two-day working group at the invitation of the Kunstraum’s co-directors, Beatrice von Bismarck, Diethelm Stoller, and Ulf Wuggenig. Joining the organizers and co-directors in contributing to the working group discussions were a number of practitioners invited by Draxler and Fraser, including: Judith Barry, Ute Meta Bauer, Jochen Becker, Ulrich Bischoff, Iwona Blazwick, Susan Cahan, Michael Clegg, Stephan Dillemuth, Renée Green, Martin Guttmann, Renate Lorenz, Christian Philipp Müller, Fritz Rahmann, and Fred Wilson. The incredibly candid, and critically reflexive, working group discussions between the organizers, Kunstraum representatives, and the invited practitioners were recorded on videotape, and this compelling video document was then shown as part of the exhibition, Services: The Conditions and Relations of Service Provision in Contemporary Project Oriented Artistic Practice (Kunstraum Lüneburg, January 24 – February 20, 1994). Immediately following its debut at the Kunstraum Lüneburg, the Services exhibition travelled to the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (1994), the Kunstverein Munich (1994), the Depot in Vienna (1995), Sous-sol, Ecole Supérieure d’Art Visuel in Geneva (1995), and the Provinciaal Museum in Hasselt (1995). The exhibition project was then further realized under the title Parasite at Clocktower, P.S. 1, New York (1997), and as Antagonisms Museum D’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2001). Working groups with different newly invited contributors and representatives of the hosting institution were organized but not recorded on video.

 

The Services exhibition—and the closed-door working group as a central operative structure by which the exhibition itself was produced—came out of collaborative research that Draxler and Fraser had conducted into the concept of service provision. Their research aimed at identifying in economic terms what they considered a shared condition of art practices which, in the early 1990s, consistently resulted in ephemeral displays and activities that were not transferred into the art market as objects for sale. For instance, Draxler and Fraser considered to what extent economic theories of service provision could further an understanding of how artists exhibiting non-transferrable works ask for fees from exhibiting institutions. Their research into service provision requested a re-evaluation of the socioeconomic conditions and relations under which artistic practices were being carried out. By introducing the term ‘service provision’ to identify certain labor in the art field, they drew from a long history of social, legal, and economic analysis of service work.

 

One of the key determinants of service work is that it is a form of labor that incorporates both production and consumption, interacting between these two realms at ever-adaptable working time requirements. The temporal flexibility—the adjustable disciplining of time—required to produce in direct and immediate response to the consumer’s demands, places service work under the often precarious legal standards of subcontracted and freelance contracted work. Within service provision, employers and consumers increasingly share employing functions. The producer’s proximity to the inclinations of consumers is significant to considering abuses, and the variable working time condition has created deeply asymmetrical relations between employers and employees. The gendered and racially-specific dimension of service work, and the socially structured identities and bodies of those hired to perform services, is crucial to understanding abuses that continue to be exacted upon service workers. The exploitation, dispossession, and deprivation exacted upon hired service workers must also be considered with relation to the foundational and continuous histories of slavery, peonage, and human-trafficking. As a form of commodified labor that is contracted out entirely on-demand, the provision of work services has transformed businesses and organizations into contracting agencies that shift the costs of providing benefits, legal protections, and tax contributions onto the worker. These legally ratified exemptions for employers have made the hiring of work services increasingly pervasive within the global economy.

 

Service provision studies identify an extensive labor sector, and a widely reproduced model for how labor is managed, which has yet to be fully integrated into labor law practice, organized labor, and institutional hiring policies. The obstacles to regulating service work are numerous. There are the legislative complexities of applying shared governance arrangements to distinct services that are precured through individual privately-governed contracts—written or verbal agreements that are often merely one-sided offers with no input or negotiation on terms and conditions that benefit the service worker. And, perhaps moreover, there are the ideological impediments to realizing labor standards for service work. The responsiveness between production and consumption, and the variable working time that characterizes service provision, are often held up as ideal conditions, evidence that the service worker has seemingly greater individual autonomy. Service work, and freelance labor broadly, is promoted for its independence, allowing greater control over when, where, and for whom individuals work. But it is well known that the title of “independent curator,” for instance, is a euphemism for an occupation that by repeatedly claiming to be independent disavows the actual dependencies at work. We very rarely learn who is actually being depended on, and by what means they are being depended on, when affirming independence. Laboring relations are concealed in the dominant model of artistic production in part because asserting the artist’s autonomy from governing institutions, supply chains, and production systems too often also repudiates the laboring relations that constitute these sites. Persistent claims of artistic autonomy foreclose a process of collectively organizing the specific conditions by which we work, and together assess the burdens of our laboring subjectivities. Ultimately, by maintaining the declarative politics of creative autonomy, artists, curators, and other cultural producers do not solely compartmentalize, negate, contradict, or omit the material politics of their working conditions, they also usurp shared struggles.

 

During the Services working group at the Kunstraum Lüneburg in 1994, the contributors openly discussed their past work-related experiences and had direct exchanges about the immediate struggles of their shared working conditions. The video document of the two-day long discussions offers a sustained view of these shared struggles, messy interactions, and complex questions that took place over the course of an introductory session, four thematic sessions titled, Serving Institutions, Serving Audiences, Serving Communities, Serving Art and Artists, a concluding session, as well as a public presentation by the organizers and participants. The exhibition, Working Groups, at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart emphasizes these working group discussions that took place at the Kunstraum Lüneburg, presenting a history of individual and collective dilemmas facing workers in the field of art. And by underscoring the Services working group structure itself, Working Groups seeks to actualize the exhibition’s history—rushing this past into the present by proposing a model of intervention-meaning and collective organizing that can be applied to the current historical moment of labor relations and governance arrangements within and beyond the field of artistic production.

 

Released in conjunction with the exhibition, Working Groups, is a newly produced publication, The Services Working Group (1994 – 1995), published by Fillip, Vancouver. This book revisits the history of the Services working group and reconsiders its political imperatives with relation to the current realities of the art field. The book features a newly produced English/German bilingual transcript of the entirety of the original Services working group discussions. The translation of this transcript was done by Fiona Bryson and co-produced by the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Kunstraum Leuphana University of Lüneburg. Bryson’s translation also forms the German language subtitles which accompany the Working Groups presentation of the Services working group video document.

This exhibition has been realized with public funding from the city of Stuttgart
Additional funding for this exhibition has been provided by Wüstenrot Stiftung and Kunstraum of the Leuphana University Lueneburg
The publication, The Services Working Group (1994 – 1995), released in conjunction with this exhibition, is published by Fillip, Vancouver

Photograph by Michael Koch, Courtesy of Kunstraum of the Leuphana University Lueneburg

Office:
Hannah Becker, Assistant General Management
Regine Pfisterer, Accounting and Membership Services
Romy Range, General Manager

Technical Crew:
RIdvan Civelek
Eva Dörr
Kai Fischer
Siggi Kalnbach, Technical Manager
Michelin Kober
Rebecca Ogle
Markus Feifel Pargas
Max Reschke
Anne Römpp
Ciara Tierney

Künstlerhaus Exhibition Educators:
Thora Gerstner
Maya Roismann
Anna Romanenko
Mira Simon
Björn Kühn

Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Working Groups, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2020 01.01.2020
Eric Golo Stone appointed new artistic director at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, begins January 1st, 2020
News
01.01.2020

Eric Golo Stone has been appointed as the new artistic director of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. He will begin working in the position January 1, 2020. Stone will succeed Fatima Hellberg, whose tenure as artistic director concludes in December, 2019.

Stone’s writing and exhibitions emphasize legal mechanisms and socioeconomic conditions that constitute the production, distribution, and reception of art. From 2013 to 2017 he was a curator at LAXART, Los Angeles. In 2018, he organized the exhibition and program, Contractual Situations We Live By, at the Kunsthalle Bern. In addition to currently working on multiple book projects, he is organizing, US Code: Title 26, a forthcoming research initiative and exhibition at Artists Space, New York, which considers the consequential relationship between the art field, tax law, and systemic inequality in the United States. His essays have been published in Afterall, October, Texte zur Kunst, and Flash Art, among other publications. He is a recipient of the 2018 Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant for the book, Artist Contracts in the Political Economy, which examines how artists utilize contracts to intervene in the legal framings, transactional structures, property relations, debt obligations, and labor conditions that artistic production operates within.

Stone said in a statement, “The Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is a more than 40-year ongoing process of experimental institution-making. It has consistently been a space where ideas of institutional governance are questioned, enacted, and embodied as artistic interests. The artistic directorship at the Künstlerhaus has always been structured as a multi-year project, and those who have been elected to the position of artistic director often draw from their art practice backgrounds or maintain artistic criteria at the core of their work. It is this particular institutional identity that I believe makes the Künstlerhaus uniquely qualified to respond to the current structural problems that are so evident in the artworld. A young generation of practitioners today fully recognize how the art field globally has become indicative of, and attendant to, wide-spread socioeconomic inequality and exploitation. I feel it is imperative that art institutions give space for this awareness while considering the actual lived conditions and relations that circulate art as inextricably bound to the content-related symbolic, sensorial, and affective systems of artworks themselves. I look forward to building on the history of the Künstlerhaus as an institution where the organizing of policies can be realized as deliberate and substantive, restless and unruly, artistic experimentation.”

 

The team, the advisory board and the board of the Künstlerhaus are looking forward to their future collaboration with Eric Golo Stone.

 

Dr. Hannelore Paflik-Huber, 1st chair of the board

 

For more information please contact Romy Range (rr@kuenstlerhaus.de)

 

photo: Sidonie Loiseleux
2019 16.11.2019
Day Is Done
Mike Kelley
Events
16.11.2019

Mike Kelley
Day Is Done
Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstructions #2–#32
2005–6, 169 min, colour, sound

Mike Kelley’s absurdist masterpiece, Day Is Done, is a fractured feature-length musical, featuring vampires, goths, hillbillies, mimes and demons. The video comprises parts #2 through #32 of Kelley’s multi-faceted project Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstructions, in which trauma, abuse and repressed memory are refracted through personal and mass-cultural experience. In creating the work, Kelley collected hundreds of high school yearbook photographs of ‘extracurricular activities’, specifically those that represent what Kelley has termed as ‘socially accepted rituals of deviance’. He arranged the images into various categories, including religious performances, thugs, dance, hick and hillbilly, Halloween and goth, satanic, mimes, and equestrian events. Each of the 31 video chapters of the film is based on one of these categories, and consists of a performance or time-based recreation of the activities recorded in the photographs, all set at an undefined institutional building and gymnasium referred to as the ‘Educational Complex’. The result is an intentionally disjointed narrative that speaks to the cult of cultural and institutional rituals, the complex vulnerability of adolescence, and the related adult experience of potentially traumatic buried memories.

 

Day Is Done exemplifies Kelley’s fascination with what he called the ‘American Carnivalesque’, an ambivalent category oscillating between humour, eroticism, darkness, and alienation. Day Is Done treats its subjects with an approach that is not only dutifully anthropological – identifying and cataloging behaviors and types – but is also radically reconstructive, adding layers of perversity, violence, and surrealism to socially accepted rituals and folk entertainment.

 

A screening at Künstlerhaus Kino accompanying Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition CONSTITUTION.

Image: Mike Kelley, Day Is Done, 2005-6. Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York and the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts, Los Angeles.
2019 07.11.2019
New publication: Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. 40 Jahre 1978–2018
News
Publications
07.11.2019
Edited by Hannelore Paflik-Huber  

The Künstlerhaus Stuttgart e.V. is a special institution with a special history. As the first chairwoman of the association and an art historian, Hannelore Paflik-Huber has edited a publicationto mark its fortieth anniversary.

The Künstlerhaus was founded in 1978 by a group of Stuttgart artists and has since developed into a nationally and internationally renowned institution for contemporary art.
The history of its curation over the last four decades is told through interviews with the artistic directors.

Two texts recount the Künstlerhaus’ history: one deals with the period from 1974 to its foundation in 1978, and the other with the building’s initial construction as a luggage factory by its two Jewish owners.

Over seventy leading artistic and political figures and artists associated with the Künstlerhaus explain the special significance of this institution, while the stars of the workshops and studios tell the story of these other two important pillars of the establishment.

The list of authors: Marius Babias, Rudolf Bumiller, Gerd Dieterich, Hildegarde Duane, Jesko Fezer, Liam Gillick, Dietrich Heißenbüttel, Fatima Hellberg, Hans Dieter Huber, MATHESON WHITELEY & Simon Jones, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Hannelore Paflik-Huber, Romy Range, Rachel Reupke, Anna Romanenko, Joachim E. Schielke, Ruby Sircar, Wolfgang Stübler, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Heidemarie von Wedel, Georg Winter, Didem Yazıcı, and Philipp Ziegler.

The interviews featured are between Ulrich Bernhardt and Jean-Baptiste Joly; Veit Görner, Rudolf Bumiller, and Markus Brüderlin; Ute Meta Bauer and Maria Lind; Nicolaus Schafhausen and Vanessa Joan Müller; Fareed Armaly and Constanze Ruhm; Elke aus dem Moore and Alice Cantaluppi; Axel Wieder and Anja Casser; Misal Adnan Yıldız and Hito Steyerl; and Fatima Hellberg and Sabeth Buchmann.

The cover was designed by British artist Liam Gillick, and the book design is by Ronald Kolb.
This important reference work on this art institution was published by av edition and is available from them or from the Künstlerhaus Stuttgartdirectly. It can be ordered by emailing sales@avedition.de or info@kuenstlerhaus.de

German
664 pages, softcover
450images
20 x 26 cm
ISBN 978-3-89986-287-4
€ 49 [D]

photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
photo: Frank Kleinbach
2019 20.10.–08.12.2019
CONSTITUTION
Ghislaine Leung
Exhibition
20.10.–08.12.2019
Opening:
Sat, 19.10.2019
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

Through a small door sat recessed within a heavy-set wall, white gloss painted walls hang and fold down into a space punctuated by several black gloss coated doors. Tonal sound fills the space in pockets and holes that shift and move. Directly opposite is a single prefabricated white metal panel filled with polyurethane and secured with bolts via white powder-coated metal brackets to the concrete floor. Fixed frontally to this is a small white powder-coated, wall-mounted heater powered by a single small, dark grey and lime green box with digital display also powering a small ceramic pink, white and green house-shaped object containing a light bulb. Mounted to the right are two tall long black speakers, a bit too close together, from which emit the aforementioned sounds. At a distance and facing these, are three more prefabricated white metal panels filled with polyurethane and secured with bolts via white powder-coated metal brackets to the concrete floor. Each panel contains one single plug power supply that runs, with white coated electrical cable, to multiple adapters set into white surface-mounted wall sockets. Two of these panels have small black plastic moulded lanterns attached to them, the white coated cables for which run to the plug points of another. Running behind and parallel to these, a row of forty ceramic objects with black text printed on them are wrapped in pairs in an abundance of red heart and clear cellophane with a combination of oversized pull bows and light pink and red curled ribbon that sits, entrail-like, at the base of each object. Set back against this line, are a further two larger prefabricated white metal panels filled with polyurethane and secured with bolts via white powder-coated metal brackets into the concrete floor. Both panels contain small fixed double-glazed windows with vents and double plug power supplies that each run with white coated electrical cable to single adapters set into white surface-mounted wall sockets. On the back of one panel, mounted low and close, is a large monitor screen running a video file from a small concealed media player, the cables of which are held together with a combination of cable ties and an unlocked heart-shaped padlock. To power this equipment, a long white lead folds around to reach the power source of the second panel. The sockets of the first panel remain unused and covered. Also featured, hung low on the white gloss walls are 272 close-cropped images taken over the years 2017, 2018, 2019 inclusive.

CONSTITUTION was commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London, (25 January – 24 March, 2019) with production support by EMPAC, The Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute through their artist in residence programme. Additional and context-contingent elements have been produced for Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

Realised with the generous support of Fürstenberg Zeitgenössisch, Donaueschingen and ESSEX STREET, New York.

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Lovers, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Children (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Children (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Loads (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, Foto: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Loads (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Bosses (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, phto: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Lovers, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New Yor, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Lovers (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Lovers (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Lovers, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Parents, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Flags (detail), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ghislaine Leung, Closer, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and ESSEX STREET, New York, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2019 20.10.–08.12.2019
Factor X / The Work
Abel Auer
Exhibition
20.10.–08.12.2019
Opening:
Sat, 19.10.2019
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

On the one hand, a deep-seated continuity appears to link all things and all events and lend them a significance that provokes wonder. Whether this continuity is seen as material or ideal, magical or rational, it gives a sense of an immanent and expansive connection – a connective tissue and consciousness extending beyond the one I. On the other, there is the feeling that things are out of control, heading in a direction that is impossible, severed and out of joint. There is a flickering  between these positions in Abel Auer’s work.

 

Much of his art has to do with paying attention to the hidden, obscure and unknowable – that place where sheer cognition will not take us. A space not so much explored as a trajectory of escapism, but as an urgent material and spiritual necessity. The intersection, between the concrete, and that which cannot be contained within a dominant archetype of the real, not as poles but as totally interconnected parts, is central to his thinking. A thinking and making which moves between a pitch and logic of spiritual histories of the 19th and early 20th century avant-garde, and the intensity and fervour of the conspiracy, and the dark web.

 

This show has developed from an extended period of exchange around survivalism and modes of living with extinction, with radical unity, magic and beauty. Factor X / The Work comprises drawings and paintings, collage, video, props and materials of Auer’s – a proposition and temporary structure of existing and newly realised work.

 

Abel Auer (b. 1974, Munich) was a co-founder of the Hamburg-based collective Isotrop in the 1990s, followed by long-standing collaborations with artists including Kai Althoff, Dorota Jurczak and Armin Krämer. His work has been exhibited at Corvi-Mora, London; Etablissement d’en Face, Brussels; Michael Benevento, Los Angeles; P.S.1 MoMA, New York; Bozar Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels, amongst others. Over the last six years, Auer has been based in Stuttgart, where he also ran the project space Staub Raum (Künstlerhaus Stuttgart). From October, 2019 he is professor at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg (HFBK). Auer is represented by Corvi-Mora, London; Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf, Galerie Jo van de Loo, Munich and Galerie für Gegenwartskunst Barbara Claassen-Schmal, Bremen.

Realised with the generous support of Corvi-Mora, London; Fürstenberg Zeitgenössisch, Donaueschingen; and Albrecht Hauff, Thieme Verlag

Aber Auer, Factor X / The Work, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, The Door, 2014, oil and acrylic on canvas, 200 x 80 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Aber Auer, Factor X / The Work, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, The Internet, 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas, 100 x 90 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, Blakefall, 2019, ink on paper, 49 x 77 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, Blakefall, 2019, ink on paper, 49 x 77 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, Wishing on a Star, 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas, 70 x 85 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Aber Auer, Factor X / The Work, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Aber Auer, Factor X / The Work, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, Inferno, 2016, ink on paper, 54,5 x 42,5 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Abel Auer, Dying Baobab, 2015-19, oil and acrylic on canvas, 179 x 200 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Aber Auer, Factor X / The Work, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Aber Auer, Factor X / The Work, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2019 08.06.–15.09.2019
High Windows, Dead Birds
Stephen Sutcliffe
Exhibition
08.06.–15.09.2019
Opening:
Fri, 07.06.2019
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

Taking a cue from Philip Larkin’s poetry collections, The Less Deceived, The Whitsun Weddings, and High Windows, Stephen Sutcliffe’s new works have been a long time in the making and are a set of reduced and distilled video collages. These extend Sutcliffe’s longstanding obsessions with cultural confidence, social class and meditations on death and failure, and are presented in dialogue with selected videos, spanning from the early 2000s until the present.

 

Sutcliffe has had an ongoing engagement with literature in his practice, a strand pushed, and also complicated in this new body of work. There are immediate affinities in tone and approach between Sutcliffe and Larkin: the attempt to render a time through the lens of private experience, and the movement between troubled realism, dejection and wit. Working with the format of the short-form collaged video, Sutcliffe both channels the distinctive structure and mood of his literary references and extends them into his own distinctive language and time.

 

In the biography of Larkin, as with many of the writers who have influenced Sutcliffe’s work, including East German author Uwe Johnson, there is a strand of withdrawal; an active seeking out of distictively remote places, and a form of “leaning into bleakness”. There is an ambivalent life-work connection in this approach: non-participation combined with a desire for the unaffected and social portrayal of a time – an attitude and relation with visibility which would be difficult, if not impossible, to maintain in the present. Sutcliffe’s new videos I am (for the birds) and General Knowledge continue this logic of ambivalence, works that reflect with melancholy and absurdity on cultural belonging and entrapment.

 

High Windows, Dead Birds marks the most comprehensive presentation of the artist’s work to date, and the first in a German context, encompassing the new videos and retrospective elements, alongside spatial interventions in response to Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

Glasgow based artist Stephen Sutcliffe (1968, Harrogate) creates film collages from an extensive archive of television, film sound, broadcast images and spoken word recordings which he has been collecting since childhood. Often reflecting on aspects of culture and identity, the results are melancholic, poetic and satirical amalgams which subtly tease out and critique ideas of class-consciousness and cultural authority. Recent solo exhibitions include: Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs, Talbot Rice Edinburgh; Twixt, Cup and Lip, Hepworth Wakefield (2017); Going Over, Rob Tufnell, London (2015); Workings out, Tramway, Glasgow (2013); and Cubitt, London (2009). Group exhibitions: Container and Contained, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Germany; Down where changed, Cubitt, London; The Reluctant Narrator, Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon, Portugal; and Gaudel De Stampa, Paris (2015). Publications include Sutcliffe at Fifty (Sternberg Press, 2019) and Much Obliged (Bookworks, 2019), a kind of autobiography.

Photography: Frank Kleinbach

Stephen Sutcliffe, Despair, 2009, 17 min 22 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, High Windows, Dead Birds, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, High Windows, Dead Birds, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, High Windows, Dead Birds, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, High Windows, Dead Birds, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, Scenes from the Life of an Impatient Man, 2015, 2 min 11 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, Plum, 2012, 4min 23 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, I am (for the birds), 2019, 2 min 35 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, Despair, 2009, 17 min 22 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephen Sutcliffe, Despair, 2009, 17 min 22 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2019 05.05.2019
Zauber der Moderne III
Metabolismus & Matinée
Events
Festival
05.05.2019
Curated by:
Michael Paukner and Fatima Hellberg

Zauber der Moderne is a three-day music festival at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, extending across two levels, with concerts and performances, a screening programme and salon. The festival is open daily from 4pm with films by amongst others, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Tim Plester, Rob Curry and Richard Olivier, and dinners prepared by Björn Luchterhand.

 

PROGRAMME

 

Sunday 5 May 2019, from 4pm
Metabolismus
Matinée

Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
Metabolismus, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
2019 04.05.2019
Zauber der Moderne II
Alasdair Roberts, F.S.K., Vic Godard & Subway Sect
Events
Festival
04.05.2019
Curated by:
Michael Paukner and Fatima Hellberg

Zauber der Moderne is a three-day music festival at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, extending across two levels, with concerts and performances, a screening programme and salon. The festival is open daily from 4pm with films by amongst others, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Tim Plester, Rob Curry and Richard Olivier, and dinners prepared by Björn Luchterhand. The festival is conceived with set design by Julia Lenzmann and Monika Nuber, with visual elements by Graham Lambkin and Christian Flamm.

 

PROGRAMM

Alasdair Roberts
F.S.K.
Vic Godard & Subway Sect

F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
F.S.K., Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Michael Paukner, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Vic Godard & Subway Sect, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Alasdair Roberts, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
Alasdair Roberts, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photography: Markus Milcke
DJ Flora, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019
2019 03.05.2019
Zauber der Moderne I
Richard Youngs, Shirley Collins, Graham Lambkin
Events
Festival
03.05.2019
Curated by:
Michael Paukner and Fatima Hellberg

At 5pm, the screening programme launches with The Ballad of Shirley Collins, followed by a Q&A with Collins and producer Paul Williams.

Zauber der Moderne is a three-day music festival at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart with Richard Youngs, Shirley Collins, Graham Lambkin, Alasdair Roberts, F.S.K., Vic Godard & Subway Sect and Metabolismus.

This is a wilfully assorted combination of sensibilities and approaches, where connections extend beyond stylistic categories and speak of shared affinities: the sounds contain certain contingent and transformative qualities, as well as being brought together by the programmers being fans and followers of the music. Zauber der Moderne is conceived as a total experience extending across two levels of Künstlerhaus – there will be a film programme in the cinema, running alongside the music festival, a salon and bar with food and drink – looking to gather and combine the avant-garde music and arts scenes of Stuttgart and beyond.

 

With visual elements by Graham Lambkin and Christian Flamm, set design by Monika Nuber and Julia Lenzmann, a bar by Moritz Finkbeiner and food by Björn Luchterhand.

 

PROGRAMME

Friday 3 May from 8pm
Richard Youngs
Shirley Collins with Ian Kearey
Graham Lambkin

Image: Christian Flamm

Shirley Collins, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Shirley Collins with Ian Kearey, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Shirley Collins with Ian Kearey, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Shirley Collins, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Shirley Collins, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Photography: Markus Milcke
Graham Lambkin, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Graham Lambkin, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Foto: Markus Milcke
Graham Lambkin, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Graham Lambkin, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Richard Youngs, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Richard Youngs, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Richard Youngs, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Richard Youngs, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Shirley Collins, Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
Zauber der Moderne, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, Photography: Markus Milcke
2019 28.03.–26.04.2019
ohne Auftrag
Ingo Busch, Jochen Detscher, Ute Fischer-Dieter, Tilda George, Thora Gerstner, Susanne Hartmann, Barbara Karsch-Chaïeb, Karima Klasen, Christiane Lesch, Gisela List, Mark Metzner, Georg Ozory, Alexandra Poleschal, Johannes Rave, Christiana Teufel, Damaris Wurster
Exhibition
Studios
Workshops
28.03.–26.04.2019
Opening:
Wed, 27.03.2019
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Carolin Wurzbacher

Exhibition of the workshops and studios
in the city hall, 4th floor

 

only available in German

 

With support of the Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart

Design Georg Ozory, Courtesy Georg Ozory
2019 16.03.–26.05.2019
SPEED 2
James Richards and Leslie Thornton
Exhibition
16.03.–26.05.2019
Opening:
Fri, 15.03.2019
18:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg and James Richards with Matt Fitts

SPEED 2 is shown at Malmö Konsthall and is the second iteration of the exhibition, following its first presentation at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. It takes the form of an expanded version, commissioned with Künstlerhaus and realised in dialogue with the spaces of Malmö Konsthall.

SPEED 2 comprises three major newly conceived works by James Richards and Leslie Thornton, alongside a show-within-the-show convened by Richards with works by Horst Ademeit, Tolia Astakhishvili, Adelhyd van Bender, Bruce Conner, Emily Feather, Terence McCormack, Vi Khi Nao, Jeff Preiss, Jens Thornton and Thomas Zummer.

 

In the making of SPEED 2, Richards and Thornton have been concerned with specific psychic and temporal states, rushes of interconnectedness and scientific wonder, as well as a sense of ecological dread and paranoia. The oscillation between an ordering impulse, and the relinquishing of control is a central feature of SPEED 2, one that returns in the exhibitions’ different modes: cinema screening, video mural, sound installation, study room and group show.

 

Many of the works in the group exhibition were made against a backdrop of apprehension and self-destruction during the Cold War, with its at times uncanny resonances with the present moment. The atmosphere contains an obsessive energy, a recurring fascination with rays, mind altering effects and rituals and the systematic sorting and recording of experience. It is sense of frantic repetition and labour, which van Bender described as ‘Divine Drudgery’, a spirit also present in Bruce Conner’s psychedelic Inkblot Drawings.

 

There is an impulse of collaboration that brought about SPEED 2, one shaped by the artists’ joint residency at CERN. This center for nuclear research became a working-site and a space for thinking artistically – the largest machine in the world, seeking the smallest particle, a combination between the epic and the mundane that recurs in the logic of SPEED 2. The exhibition comprises discrete and individual new works, from Richards’ large-scale video mural Phrasing and Thornton’s cinema installation Cut from Liquid to Snake, to the wall text and video installation Sheep Machine Redux, conceived for the spaces of Malmö Konsthall. It is a body of work developed from the artists’ individual practices but also from the third mind of collaboration, a channeling of and at times conscious unsettling of each others’ sensitivities. The basic biographical contrasts between Richards and Thornton are apparent: gender, age and sexuality are all points of difference. What has drawn them together is an inclination they seem to share: that of grabbing charged material, and without apparent judgement or moralising, filling and emptying it. There is an attuned pitch for locating and unsettling any received and comfortable meaning. And at the same time, they produce works with a highly specific sense of the contemporary moment and the urgencies that it presents.

 

Commissioned by Malmö Konsthall and Künstlerhaus Stuttgart

Realised with the generous support of Pedro Barbosa; Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg; Wüstenrot Stiftung; Ritter Sport; pbb Stiftung für Kunst und Wissenschaft and the British Council, Berlin.
With special thanks to Rodeo, Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Cabinet Gallery, Andrea Bellini, Centre d’art Contemporain Genève und CERN.

James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Helene Toresdotter
James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Helene Toresdotter
James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Helene Toresdotter
SPEED 2, Malmö Konsthall, 2019, exhibition view, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Horst Ademeit, Observation Photos, 1990–2003, inscribed polaroids, 11 × 9 cm. Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Adelhyd van Bender, folders, 1999–2014, mixed on paper in plastic, 32 × 29 cm, Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Helene Toresdotter
SPEED 2, Malmö Konsthall, 2019, exhibition view, Foto: Helene Toresdotter
SPEED 2, Malmö Konsthall, 2019, exhibition view, photo: Helene Toresdotter
SPEED 2, Malmö Konsthall, 2019, exhibition view, photo: Helene Toresdotter
SPEED 2, Malmö Konsthall, 2019, exhibition view, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Adelhyd van Bender, folders, 1999–2014, mixed on paper in plastic, 32 × 29 cm, Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Leslie Thornton, WhatItIsToBePerfect, 2018, HD video, 32 min, 47 sec. Courtesy of the artist, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Tolia Astakhishvili and James Richards, Untitled, 2019-, HD video, 34 min, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Leslie Thornton, Cut from Liquid to Snake, 2018, HD video, 27 min, Courtesy of the artist; Rodeo, London/ Piraeus, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Leslie Thornton, Cut from Liquid to Snake, 2018, HD video, 27 Min, Courtesy of the artist; Rodeo, London/ Piraeus, photo: Helene Toresdotter
James Richards and Leslie Thornton, Crossing, 2016, HD video, 19 min, 12 sec, photo: Helene Toresdotter
James Richards and Leslie Thornton, Crossing, 2016, HD video, 19 min, 12 sec, photo: Helene Toresdotter
James Richards and Leslie Thornton, Crossing, 2016, HD video, 19 min, 12 sec, photo: Helene Toresdotter
James Richards and Leslie Thornton, Crossing, 2016, HD video, 19 min, 12 sec, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Vi Khi Nao, James Richards and Leslie Thornton, Sheep Machine Redux, 2019, photo: Helene Toresdotter
Vi Khi Nao, James Richards and Leslie Thornton, Sheep Machine Redux, 2019, photo: Helene Toresdotter
2019 03.03.–21.04.2019
Heedless Sleep
Henrik Potter
Exhibition
03.03.–21.04.2019
Opening:
Sat, 02.03.2019
16:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

Each part of Henrik Potter’s new body of work, Heedless Sleep, pulls a little thread in the show, combining to form a strange maximalist entity. The individual pieces share an outline, but they also throw curve balls at each other, pulling in registers of both great sincerity and kitsch. Together, they have to be reconciled to share an easy/uneasy coexistence.

 

Realised for the spaces of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, the installation has a strict core composition, yet one undercut by the idiosyncrasies and excesses of the works themselves – a kind of seeping logic, which is as much a formal as a conceptual consideration. There is something unmistakably physical about the human-scale screens of Heedless Sleep, in both form and approach. And not unlike bodies, the works are tangibly fragile and tough. Made of wood, cloth, paint and clay, the materials have been laboured to a point where touch has left its imprints; they share a sense of the smudged and worn physicality of objects that have been handled and used over time. Heedless Sleep takes current conversations around embodiment, precarity and health, and pushes them into a territory that is neither sanitized nor distinctively abject – there is a fascination with fragility and toughness, a body ‘with dirt under its fingernails.’ A channeling of the remarkable resilience and insubstantiality of bodies that live and change and fall apart on levels that both are palpable and minute. In this aesthetic, there is a logic which runs contrary to ideas of slickness, entrepreneurialism and fabrication – a form of making more closely preoccupied with the inconvenient and awkward registers of being.

 

In their copiousness and strangeness, the works stand as a kind of community, developed over more than a year. On the one hand, this mode of artistic production is connected with interiority, and inevitably, a mapping out of the self; on another, a way of tuning into an extended moment of great uncertainty and precarity, works made against the backdrop of recent social and political crisis. The connections made in the installation shift between the material and the immaterial; a tuning into the tipping points where affect and abstract worry become physical, on an individual and communal level. These movements and rifts form an undercurrent, flowing through the work and its attitude.

 

The concerns of Heedless Sleep are articulated both through form, and through the process of artistic production, a matter of “looking for that point where a work becomes personable, where it’s open to you and almost pathetically there that you have to accept it how it is.” As such, the elements are not conceived within the one idea or gesture, but inhabit a suspended sense of negotiation, moving between registers that are rooted both in a sense of pleasure and a great melancholy.

 

English/Swedish artist Henrik Potter lives and works in London. Recent exhibitions include Landlords are not currently collecting rent in self-love, Cell Project Space, London, 2016; Oh, of course, you were berry picking, DREI, Cologne, 2015 and Down Where Changed, Cubitt, London, 2014 and PdT at Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2014.

Henrik Potter, It said, it said (still life, it said), (detail), 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, Heedless Sleep, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, A figure (a mugging) & J’arrive / Figure (bruised), (detail), 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, A Joke / First Born / A Question (after all), (detail), 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, Figure (awkward), (detail), 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, Les Amants (2018) (en deux parties), (detail), 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, For Rose (in love) / oder ‘Goth Matisse’, (detail), 2019, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Henrik Potter, Portrait (true blue), (detail), photo: Frank Kleinbach
2019 23.02.2019
Künstler*innen fragen Künstler*innen
Abel Auer, Marc Matter, Birgit Megerle and Elena Poulou
Events
23.02.2019

Is there a form of attitude, or logic, that is intrinsic to artistic thinking? And if so, what is the role of contradiction in formulating an artistic model of thought? These considerations are at the core of a two-day symposium with Abel Auer, Marc Matter, Birgit Megerle and Elena Poulou at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Staatsgalerie Stuttgart.

Taking the form of open and closed formats, the discussions and presentations are happening in dialogue with an avant-garde legacy of artistic making, and more specifically a channeling and subversion of the thought-form of Marcel Duchamp. A tuning into also the more ambivalent facets of his work, including the potential of simultaneous affirmation and negation, the distrust of language, and the call to introduce one’s own system of measurement.

 

Moderated by Fatima Hellberg, Michael Hiltbrunner and Susanne M.I. Kaufmann.

At 5.30pm there will be a guided tour through the exhibition Marcel Duchamp. 100 Fragen. 100 Antworten.

The event is a collaboration between Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and the Institute for Contemporary Art Research of the Zürcher Hochschule der Künste.

 

 

John Cage, Music for Marcel Duchamp, 1947.
2019 23.01.2019
Was ist Natur, was ist der Mensch, was ist Kunst bei Aristoteles
Klaus Corcilius
Events
23.01.2019

Mysticism has never been a ‘safe’ pursuit, the celebrated Kabbalah scholar Gerschom Scholem observed. Given its antagonistic relationship to institutional doctrine, the dangers for its practitioners are self-evident. But the risks for the interested scholar, Scholem suggested, are also substantial. The focus of Alpha Centauri, an experiment in two parts with students from the Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm and the State Academy of Fine Arts in Stuttgart, has been on some of the intersections, and their discomfort, between spirit and materiality.

This open seminar, with philosopher Klaus Corcilius explores a series of core considerations of reasoning, starting with the question “what is thought?”. Through a combination of a lecture and discussion, and drawing on his long-running work on the thinking of Aristotle, Corcilius’ presentation will be a close reading of essence, moving between the human, and nature, towards a definition of art.

Klaus Corcilius is professor of ancient philosophy at the University of Tübingen and previously associate professor at the University of California at Berkeley. His primary interest is ancient philosophy, theoretical and practical, and especially Aristotle.

Was ist Natur, was ist der Mensch, was ist Kunst bei Aristoteles, Küstlerhaus Stuttgart (2019)
2018 16.12.2018–27.01.2019
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch)
Exhibition
16.12.2018–27.01.2019
Opening:
Sat, 15.12.2018
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg and Annika Eriksson

Alpha Centauri* is an experiment in two parts with students from the Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm and the State Academy of Fine Arts, Stuttgart.

The work is oriented around two levels of the Künstlerhaus, which have been repurposed as living spaces, ateliers, and an environment activated by, and defined through individual and collective making. In the period of living and working together, a total work has been produced, parsing out the conflicting dimensions of control/frame and out of control/unpredictability.

In this chapter of Alpha Centauri, developed in collaboration with Abel Auer, with Leon Dürnay, Janis Eckhardt, Juliane Gebhardt, Hyunjeong Ko, Evgenia Kosareva, Lea Lenk, Jaewon Park, Tzusoo and Helen Weber, the students continued with the setting and parameters developed by the first group. Through both responding to, and developing their own shared logic, the space was radically reconceived and new works were produced, others altered or removed. A core focus of the discussions and sessions held throughout this process were connections between the rooted and material, and its relations to the hidden, obscure and unknowable, explored from a series of perspectives. From ethnobotanist, author and lecturer Terence McKenna’s thinking around reality as hyper dimensional, to Paul Thek’s work with the material and the contingent, to questions of intention and attention in artistic making. Within the group, a shared speculative fiction took form, the notion of the ‘Metabosch’ – an unfolding set of associations moving between the phantasmagoric world-making of Hieronymus Bosch, to a narrative of a corporate and quasi spiritual brand, ‘the Metabosch’, and life within its paradigm. It is a concept, which as the setting materialised, also acquired darker, and at times apocalyptic undertones, looping back to associations between corporate culture, ecology and black holes.

Alpha Centauri is a project testing out the possibilities and limits of the institution as host, and the processes involved with generating an environment with material and intangible layers. And is in the process, focused on living with qualities of sociability, discord, and the transformative in the teaching and making of art.

 

The project was convened by Annika Eriksson (Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm) and Fatima Hellberg (Künstlerhaus Stuttgart)

*Alpha Centauri is the star system closest to the Solar System. Researchers have sought to verify the existence of an Earth like planet in the Alpha Centauri using transits – a slight dimming in the star as the planet passes by has been detected – but no additional, conclusive evidence.

Part I of Alpha Centauri was realized by: Maiken Buus Andersen, Izabel Färnstrand, Salad Hilowle, Sonia Sagan, Oscar Kaleva Karlsson, Vida Lavén, Mari Mattsson, Linnéa Ndangoya Palmcrantz, Emilie Palmelund, Levi Sebton and Jesper Vesterlund

 

  

Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri II (Metabosch), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2018 01.12.–12.12.2018
Alpha Centauri
Maiken Buus Andersen, Izabel Färnstrand, Salad Hilowle, Sonia Sagan, Oscar Kaleva Karlsson, Vida Lavén, Mari Mattsson, Linnéa Ndangoya Palmcrantz, Emilie Palmelund, Levi Sebton and Jesper Vesterlund
Exhibition
01.12.–12.12.2018
Opening:
Fri, 30.11.2018
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg and Annika Eriksson

Alpha Centauri* is an experiment in two parts with students from the Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm and the State Academy of Fine Arts, Stuttgart.

The work is oriented around two levels of the Künstlerhaus, which will be repurposed as ateliers, living spaces, and an environment activated by, and defined through individual and collective making. In the period of living and working together, a total work is produced, parsing out the conflicting dimensions of control/frame and out of control/unpredictability.

As an educational project and experiment, Alpha Centauri is in part a meditation on the increasing ubiquity of a managerial culture and its associated emphasis on measurability, accountability, performance, and self-evaluation. The project looks at this form of management and its manifestations in the administration and mediation of art, while testing out some alternative scenarios. It is a process of staying put with the contingent nature of the given setup, and engaging with the third mind generated from within the collaborative process.

These practices connect with the history of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, a space with a tradition of self-organisation, initiated and formulated by young artists and art students in the late 70s. Here energies and pleasures of self-exile are introduced into a conversation that challenges some of its historic privileges and exclusions.

Although its outcome remains unknown, Alpha Centauri intends to live with qualities of sociability, discord, the transformative and ineffable in the teaching and making of art.

 

Part I
Maiken Buus Andersen, Izabel Färnstrand, Salad Hilowle, Sonia Sagan, Oscar Kaleva Karlsson, Vida Lavén, Mari Mattsson, Linnéa Ndangoya Palmcrantz, Emilie Palmelund, Levi Sebton and Jesper Vesterlund
Opening on 30 November, with a performance by YOR at 9pm

 

Part II of Alpha Centauri opens on 15 December, from 7pm
Leon Dürnay, Janis Eckhardt, Juliane Gebhardt, Hyunjeong Ko, Evgenia Kosareva, Lea Lenk, Jaewon Park, Tzusoo and Helen Weber

To Part II

Convened by Annika Eriksson (Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm) and Fatima Hellberg (Künstlerhaus Stuttgart)

 

*Alpha Centauri is the star system closest to the Solar System. Researchers have sought to verify the existence of an Earth-like planet in the Alpha Centauri using transits – a slight dimming in the star as the planet passes by has been detected – but no additional, conclusive evidence.

  

Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Alpha Centauri, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2018 26.10.2018
Occasional Criticism
Mike Sperlinger & Madeleine Bernstorff
Events
26.10.2018

You are warmly invited to:

The launch of Occasional Criticism, a chapbook about cinema, criticism, being an audience and the ways film bleeds into our everyday lives, by Mike Sperlinger

 

on Friday 26 October, 6pm at Delphi Kino
Tübinger Str. 6, 70178 Stuttgart
followed by a dinner at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart

 

“It is necessary to establish… that there is only one true cause because there is only one true God; that the nature or power of each thing is nothing but the will of God; that all natural causes are not true causes but only occasional causes.”

– Nicholas Malebranche

 

“A Theatre is a rarity, to be selected with care, anticipated, experienced, discussed at great length, long remembered. But a film more or less is neither here nor there.”

– Dorothy Richardson

 

In the spirit of Occasional Criticism, in which writer Mike Sperlinger explores the idea that any screening ultimately is an occasion for speculation and sociability, we do not know which film will be showing at the Delphi that night. Preceding the film is an audio recording from another cinema, captured thirty years ago in Berlin by film curator and writer Madeleine Bernstorff. The audience will receive a copy of Occasional Criticism and an invitation to carry on the conversation with Sperlinger and Bernstorff over dinner around the corner, at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

The evening is part of Gemini, curated by anorak and realised in cooperation with Akademie Schloss Solitude, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, and Delphi Kino.

 

Gemini continues with the opening of its first exhibition chapter on Friday 16 November, 7pm at Solitude’s Project Space with works by Rosa Aiello, Tupac Cruz, Daniel Hopp, James N. Kienitz Wilkins, Julica Morlok and Ana Wild.

 

Occasional Criticism, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Hannah Häußer
Occasional Criticism, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Hannah Häußer
Occasional Criticism, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Hannah Häußer
Occasional Criticism, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Hannah Häußer
2018 15.10.–27.11.2018
Das Künstlerhaus zu Gast in Waldenbuch
Katharina Culha, Jochen Detscher, Christine Dohms, Karin Eckert, Ute Fischer-Dieter, Tilda George, Thora Gerstner, Manu HarmsSchlaf, Christiane Lesch, Gisela List, Bernhard Müller, Anne Pflug, Johannes Rave, Christiana Teufel, Damaris Wurster
Events
Studios
Workshops
15.10.–27.11.2018
Opening:
Sun, 14.10.2018
11:00 o’clock

in the city hall Waldenbuch, Marktplatz 1, 71111 Waldenbuch

This year, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart celebrates its 40th anniversary. For four decades now, the Künstlerhaus has distinguished itself with an internationally renowned curatorial program. In addition, for many years it has had an interdisciplinary studio program with annually awarded scholarships as well as ten workshops, ranging from printmaking to audio to ceramics, which primarily offer local artists a place of production. In 1978, it was the wish of the initiative group to create a production and exhibition space for artists, and at the same time a place for exchange and communication. This wish was fulfilled, so that 40 years later, graduates of art academies as well as experienced local and international artists find a place of production in the Künstlerhaus, which at the same time invites discourse.
For the first time, the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, at the invitation of the Kunstfreunde Waldenbuch & Steinenbronn, is now presenting an exhibition in Waldenbuch of works by artists from the studios and workshops of the Künstlerhaus. Under the title Guest in Waldenbuch the artists take the opportunity to give an insight into their work and show besides painting, silkscreen and lithography also installations and ceramics.
The Künstlerhaus Stuttgart would like to thank the Kunstfreunde Waldenbuch & Steinenbronn for their cooperation.

 

Thora Gerstner, Clear notion, 2015, Gelatin silver print, 80 x 70 cm
2018 25.09.2018
A history of the world as it has become known to me & Pinochet Porn
Ellen Cantor
Events
Screening
25.09.2018

An evening presented by Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi and Künstlerhaus at Babylon cinema to celebrate the Berlin launch of Ellen Cantor, A history of the world as it has become known to me. With an introduction by Fatima Hellberg.

 

BABYLON

Rosa-Luxemburg-Str. 30
10178 Berlin
babylonberlin.eu

Tuesday, 25 September 2018
7pm–10.30 pm

 

Ellen Cantor, Pinochet Porn (2008–2016) is a feature-length film embodying the multifaceted work of the late artist Ellen Cantor (1961–2013). Cantor worked on this feature-length, episodic narrative about the intertwined lives of five children and their maturation into adulthood during the final five years of her life. Produced using Super 8, archival footage, and animated drawings, Pinochet Porn takes the form of a soap opera, at once tragic and comical, and marked by a subversive sexuality. The story weaves between personal, political, and historical circumstances, obliquely revolving around the political discord under General Augusto Pinochet’s regime in Chile. The film is a document of an extended moment in New York and London avant-garde art and culture, featuring a range of artists, curators, writers, filmmakers, protagonists of the underground, musicians, and their children.

 

Ellen Cantor, A history of the world as it has become known to me
Editors: Lia Gangitano, Fatima Hellberg and Jamie Stevens
Contributors: Dodie Bellamy, Jonathan Berger, John Brattin, Ellen Cantor, Lia Gangitano, Cy Gavin, Jospeh Grigely, Clara López Menéndez and John Maybury
Publishers: Sternberg Press, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts and Participant Inc
Design: Pedro Cid Proença
Copyediting: Ben Caton (EN), Gitte Lindmaier (DE)
Translation: Robert Schlicht
Price: 26 EUR

 

To order the book, please email info@kuenstlerhaus.de

The next launch will take place with a launch event at Participant Inc, New York on Sunday 28 October, from 2pm.

 

 

A history of the world as it has become known to me is realised with the generous support of the German Federal Cultural Foundation, the City of Stuttgart, Wüstenrot Foundation, the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK), and Valeria Napoleone.

Ellen Cantor, Pinochet Porn, 2008–16. Courtesy: The Estate of Ellen Cantor and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin
2018 22.09.2018
Jubilee - 40 years Künstlerhaus Stuttgart
Events
22.09.2018

On September 22, 2018 Künstlerhaus Stuttgart celebrated its 40th anniversary. In addition, we inaugurated the renovated and redesigned restaurant on the ground floor after a one-year rebuild period.
Here are some impressions of the evening with a big thank you to Wolfgang Dauner, Jon Shit as well as to all the speakers and not least to all the guests and friends of Künstlerhaus.

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Kessler Sekt, Lammbrauerei Hilsenbeck, Collegium Wirtemberg, WGV Versicherungen, Piano Fischer

view of the beergarden, photo: Florian Model
view of the beergarden, photo: Florian Model
Dr. Hannelore Paflik-Huber - host of the evening, photo: Florian Model
view of the new Lokal, photo: Florian Model
Wolfgang Dauner plays, photo: Florian Model
view of the new Lokal, photo: Florian Model
Ulrich Bernhardt, photo: Florian Model
from left to right. Kazu Ito, Donald Matheson, Simon Jones, Jack Neville, architects of the rebuild, photo: Florian Model
Jon Shit performance in the beergarden, photo: Florian Model
Jon Shit performance in the beergarden, photo: Florian Model
Jon Shit performance in our beergarden, photo: Florian Model
The new operator Sebastian Werning, photo: Florian Model
champagne reception, photo: Florian Model
2018 10.08.2018
We are building furniture with Simon Jones Studio
Events
Studios
Workshops
Education
10.08.2018

Simon Jones is a London-based architect who over the last four years has been closely involved with Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and its current rebuild. As part of the work, Jones and his collaborator Jack Neville are developing and making furniture for the new Künstlerhaus Café and bar, built collectively and on site. The workshop follows in the tradition of Künstlerhaus, where its original café and bar were built and decorated by artists, staff, and people from the neighbourhood.

 

You are warmly invited to participate and build furniture with us, in the period 10–24th of August. You do not need previous woodworking experience, but great if you do, and we would be thankful for two or more days in this period.

 

If you are interested in taking part, please contact us on info@kuenstlerhaus.de

 

Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is a non-profit institution, founded by and for artists and artistic production in 1978. At current, the entrance and ground floor are being rebuilt with design by Simon Jones Studio and Matheson Whiteley with the support of härtner ito architekten. The work is funded by the City of Stuttgart and will be completed in September 2018 to coincide with the 40th jubilee of Künstlerhaus.

The project was initiated as part of the programme of Artistic Director Fatima Hellberg and is realised in close collaboration with the Chair of Künstlerhaus’ Board, Dr. Hannelore Paflik-Huber and the General Manager, Romy Range. The rebuild follows four decades of artistic work and exhibition making at Künstlerhaus and seeks to nurture the avant-garde legacy of the institution, while addressing some current needs for a social and public space in the city of Stuttgart.

Simon Jones Studio is a multi-disciplinary design practice based in North London comprised of Simon Jones and Jack Neville. Their work combines architectural projects, exhibition design and furniture production, with design practice and hands on making. In 2015, Jones designed an auditorium for the exhibition Container and Contained and Gregg Bordowitz’ performance INPUT OUTPUT and has since been in a more long-running collaboration and dialogue with Künstlerhaus.

The work with Simon Jones Studio takes place in collaboration with Kulturregion Stuttgart within the framework of Drehmoment.

 

 

With the generous support of the City of Stuttgart. Special thanks to Verein Alnatura hilft! e.V., the Bürgerstiftung Stuttgart, Bosch GmbH, Kvadrat A/S and Holzhandlung Wider GmbH & Co. KG

Workshop, photo: Florian Model
Jack Neville with participants of our furniture workshop, photo: Florian Model
Workshop, photo: Florian Model
Workshop, photo: Florian Model
Workshop, photo: Florian Model
participant of our furniture workshop, photo: Florian Model
Detail, photo: Florian Model
Workshop, photo: Florian Model
Detail, photo: Florian Model
Workshop, photo: Florian Model
2018 07.07.2018
Das Künstlerhaus flaniert – Parcours durch den Stuttgarter Westen
Ingo Busch, Jochen Detscher, Tilda George, Sören Hiob, Yvette Hoffmann, Anna Jacobi, Katrin Kinsler, Karima Klasen, Karen Kreuselberg, Flora Lenzmann, Christiane Lesch, Gisela List, Mark Metzner, Ann-Kathrin Müller, Monika Nuber, Anne Pflug, Eva Schmeckenbecher, Christiana Teufel, Michael Wackwitz, Julia Wenz, Uta Weyrich & Eva Paulitsch, Damaris Wurster, Mona Zeiler and Ute Zeller von Heubach.
Events
Studios
Workshops
07.07.2018

Drawing on the history of Künstlerhaus as a site of artistic production, twenty-five artists associated with the organisation’s studios and production workshops present newly conceived and site-specific works in and around the Künstlerhaus neighbourhood. Realised across local cafés, bars, parks and artist-run spaces, the day and night are part of a series of events, projects and collaborations reflecting on and celebrating the 40th Jubilee of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

Realised with the support of Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart.

Participants of the Event
Participants of the Event
Participants of the Event
Ann-Kathrin Müller, The Exposition, 2015/2016
Christiane Lesch, Untitled, 2017
Ingo Busch, Make this place great again, 2018
Yvette Hoffmann, Elements on Earth, 2018
Anna Jacobi, Tempo!, 2018
Participants in front of the "Seekneiple"
Sören Hiob, Sammlung Sören Hiob, 2018
Jochen Detscher, What’s upstairs, Doc? – houses’ horrors and domestic doom, in progress 2012–2018
Anne Pflug, Longing, 2018
Christiana Teufel, peripheral territories, 2018
2018 01.07.–14.10.2018
SPEED
James Richards and Leslie Thornton with Horst Ademeit, Adelhyd van Bender, Bruce Conner, Emily Feather, Terence McCormack, Jeff Preiss and Jens Thornton
Exhibition
01.07.–14.10.2018
Opening:
Sat, 30.06.2018
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg and James Richards with Matt Fitts

SPEED takes the form of two major new commissions by James Richards and Leslie Thornton, alongside a show-within-the-show convened by Richards with works by Horst Ademeit, Adelhyd van Bender, Bruce Conner, Emily Feather, Terence McCormack, Jeff Preiss and Jens Thornton.

In the making of SPEED, Richards and Thornton have been concerned with specific psychic and temporal states, rushes of interconnectedness and scientific wonder, as well as a sense of ecological dread and paranoia. The oscillation between an ordering impulse, and the relinquishing of control is a central feature of SPEED, one that returns in the exhibitions’ different modes: cinema screening, video mural, reading room and group show.

 

Many of the works in the group exhibition were made against a backdrop of apprehension and self-destruction during the Cold War, with its at times uncanny resonances with the present moment. The atmosphere contains an obsessive energy, a recurring fascination with rays, mind altering effects and rituals and the systematic sorting and recording of experience. It is sense of frantic repetition and labour, which van Bender described as ‘Divine Drudgery’, a spirit also present in Bruce Conner’s psychedelic inkblot drawings.

 

There is an impulse of collaboration that brought about SPEED, one that renders the monologue of anxious speculation into a dialogic practice. The exhibition comprises discrete and individual new works, from Richard’s large-scale video mural Phrasing to Thornton’s cinema installation Cut from Liquid to Snake, and yet all elements have been generated from the third mind of collaboration, a channeling of and at times conscious unsettling of each other’s sensitivities. The basic biographical contrasts between Richards and Thornton are apparent: gender, age and sexuality are all points of difference. What has drawn them together is an inclination they seem to share: that of grabbing charged material, and without apparent judgement or moralising, filling and emptying it. There is an attuned pitch for locating and unsettling any received and comfortable meaning. And at the same time, they produce works with a highly specific sense of the contemporary moment and the urgencies that it presents.

 

Commissioned by Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Malmö Konsthall
The second iteration of SPEED takes place at Malmö Konsthall, 15 March – 26 May 2019

Realised with the generous support of Pedro Barbosa; Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg; Wüstenrot Stiftung; Ritter Sport; pbb Stiftung für Kunst und Wissenschaft and the British Council, Berlin.
With special thanks to Rodeo, Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Cabinet Gallery, Andrea Bellini, Centre d’art Contemporain Genève und CERN.

James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
James Richards, Phrasing, 2018, three channel digital projection, continuous loop. Courtesy of the artist; Cabinet, London; Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Rodeo, London/Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Leslie Thornton, Cut from Liquid to Snake, 2018, HD Video, 27 min. Courtesy of the artist; Rodeo, London/ Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Leslie Thornton, Cut from Liquid to Snake, 2018, HD Video, 27 min. Courtesy of the artist; Rodeo, London/ Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Leslie Thornton, Cut from Liquid to Snake, 2018, HD Video, 27 min. Courtesy of the artist; Rodeo, London/ Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Leslie Thornton, Cut from Liquid to Snake, 2018, HD Video, 27 min. Courtesy of the artist; Rodeo, London/ Piraeus, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Horst Ademeit, Observation Photos, 1990–2003, inscribed polaroids, 11 × 9 cm. Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Horst Ademeit, Observation Photos, 1990–2003, inscribed polaroids, 11 × 9 cm. Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Emily Feather, JANUARY 4, 2003, ink, 13.5 × 12 cm. Courtesy of the Bruce Conner Trust, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Bruce Conner, DISSERTATION OCTOBER 5, 1994, 1994, ink and pencil, 27 × 29.5 cm. Courtesy of the Bruce Conner Trust, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Anonymouse, INKBLOT DRAWING, 2000, ink, 45 × 42 cm. Courtesy of the Bruce Conner Trust, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Foto: Frank Kleinbach
Adelhyd van Bender, folders, 1999–2014, mixed on paper in plastic, 32 × 29 cm. Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Horst Ademeit, Daily Photos, 1990–2004, inscribed polaroids, 11 × 9 cm, Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Horst Ademeit, Daily Photos, 1990–2004, inscribed polaroids, 11 × 9 cm, Courtesy of Delmes & Zander, Cologne, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Leslie Thornton, WhatItIsToBePerfect, 2018, HD video, 32 min 47 sec, Courtesy of the artist, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Found objects and self-diagnosis kits, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Found objects and self-diagnosis kits, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Found objects and self-diagnosis kits, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jens Thornton, Untitled (surrealist in oak ridge), 1943, oil on board, 31 × 24 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jens Thornton, Untitled (surrealist in oak ridge), 1943, oil on board, 31 × 24 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
SPEED, exhibition view, 2018, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2018 18.05.2018
A history of the world as it has become known to me
Ellen Cantor
Events
Book Release
18.05.2018

With HOTEL KALIFORNIA, a special reading and performance by Karl Holmqvist.

 

A history of the world as it has become known to me is concerned with, and a document of Ellen Cantor’s work through the lens of Pinochet Porn (2008–16) and its making – an epic experimental film embodying, and radically extending her multifaceted artistic practice. Taking the form of an episodic narrative about five children growing up under the regime of General Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and shot between her dual hometowns of London and New York, history is observed through Cantor’s fictive speculations on private experience within a totalising political order. 

A history of the world as it has become known to me brings together writings and archival materials of Cantor including a reproduction in full of her drawing-based script Circus Lives from Hell (2004), alongside contributions by writers, artists, collaborators and friends reflecting on Cantor’s practice, Pinochet Porn and a singularly transgressive vision: explicitly feminist, remorselessly emotional, dramatic in tone, and, as Cantor herself liked to put it, adult in subject matter.

 

Editors: Lia Gangitano, Fatima Hellberg and Jamie Stevens
Contributors: Dodie Bellamy, Jonathan Berger, John Brattin, Ellen Cantor, Lia Gangitano, Cy Gavin, Jospeh Grigely, Clara López Menéndez and John Maybury.
Publisher: Sternberg Press, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts and Participant Inc.
Design: Pedro Cid Proença
Copyediting: Ben Caton
Translation: Robert Schlicht
Copyediting, German: Gitte Lindmaier
Price: 26 EUR
, to order the book, please email info@kuenstlerhaus.de

 

Karl Holmqvist, artist, poet and friend of Cantor will be reading HOTEL KALIFORNIA, a piece of special importance and connection – “Give it more heart and more nuance…”

 

The full launch programme includes upcoming events at Participant Inc, New York and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin.

Realised with the support of the German Federal Cultural Foundation, the City of Stuttgart, Wüstenrot Foundation, the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK), and Valeria Napoleone

Cover "A history of the world as it has become know to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Interior view "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
"A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Karl Holmquist, book launch, "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
Book launch, "A history of the world as it has become known to me", photo: Frank Kleinbach
2018 18.05.–06.06.2018
A history of the world as it has become known to me
Ellen Cantor
Exhibition
18.05.–06.06.2018
Opening:
Fri, 18.05.2018
20:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

A history of the world as it has become known to me is concerned with, and a document of Ellen Cantor’s work through the lens of Pinochet Porn (2008–16) and its making – an epic experimental film embodying, and radically extending her multifaceted artistic practice. Taking the form of an episodic narrative about five children growing up under the regime of General Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and shot between her dual hometowns of London and New York, history is observed through Cantor’s fictive speculations on private experience within a totalising political order. 

A history of the world as it has become known to me brings together writings and archival materials of Cantor including a reproduction in full of her drawing-based script Circus Lives from Hell (2004), alongside contributions by writers, artists, collaborators and friends reflecting on Cantor’s practice, Pinochet Porn and a singularly transgressive vision: explicitly feminist, remorselessly emotional, dramatic in tone, and, as Cantor herself liked to put it, adult in subject matter.

Price: 26 EUR
, to order the book, please email info@kuenstlerhaus.de

Editors: Lia Gangitano, Fatima Hellberg and Jamie Stevens
Contributors: Dodie Bellamy, Jonathan Berger, John Brattin, Ellen Cantor, Lia Gangitano, Cy Gavin, Jospeh Grigely, Clara López Menéndez and John Maybury.
Publisher: Sternberg Press, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts and Participant Inc.
Design: Pedro Cid Proença
Copyediting: Ben Caton
Translation: Robert Schlicht
Copyediting, German: Gitte Lindmaier

Karl Holmqvist, artist, poet and friend of Cantor will be reading HOTEL KALIFORNIA, a piece of special importance and connection – “Give it more heart and more nuance…”

The full launch programme includes upcoming events at Participant Inc, New York and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin.

Photography: Frank Kleinbach

Realised with the support of the German Federal Cultural Foundation, the City of Stuttgart, Wüstenrot Foundation, the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK), and Valeria Napoleone.

.

 

2018 20.04.2018
Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and The End of Selling Out
Christian Flamm, Mike Sperlinger
Events
Closing Event
20.04.2018

An outdoor screening, marking the end of Christian Flamm’s exhibition Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Mike Sperlinger’s film programme The End of Selling Out.

 

As two parallel strands of a project, Flamm’s exhibition and Mike Sperlinger’s film programme loop back to a historical conflict in cultural production. That is, to subversion and techniques of disappointment – strategies and attitudes with a particular set of histories, remainders, and subsumptions. These shifts in the moral grounds of artistic production were conjured up in Künstlerhaus Stuttgart through a combination of second thoughts, paintings from memory and a programme of moving image presented in three chapters – The Target Shoots First, The Future of Exploitation and Can Artists Sell Out?. The final get together lifts out two films from the programme, both engaging with questions of survivalism, inner necessity and aspiration by Oliver Payne/Nick Relph and Jay Chung/Q Takeki Maeda.#

 

House and Garage
by Oliver Payne and Nick Relph, 2000, 40 min

The Sixth Year (part 3)
by Jay Chung and Q Takeki Maeda, 2013, 12 min

bricks black, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and The End of Selling Out
2018 24.02.–15.04.2018
Künstlerhaus Stuttgart
Christian Flamm
Exhibition
24.02.–15.04.2018
Opening:
Fri, 23.02.2018
19:00 o’clock

„Man gewöhnt sich an einiges.“

Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is Christian Flamm’s first project dealing solely in sculpture. It brings the artist’s core interests to the fore, which are attitude and composition. This work is informed by personal recollections and based on collective memory; the past is brought into the present, until the latter becomes part of the former, eventually.

The exhibition is accompanied by The End of Selling Out, a specifically conceived screening programme, curated by Mike Sperlinger.

 

The End of Selling Out

Opening event: 23 February, 8pm
A screening of films by Paul Kelly, including the European premiere of Take Three Girls (The Dolly Mixture Story). Followed by a conversation between Sperlinger and Kelly.

Cinema looping programme – part 1: The Target Shoots First
24 February – 11 March, Wednesday to Sunday from 12-6pm

 

Debt Begins At 20
Stephanie Beroes, 1980, 40 mins
Grassroots documentary on the Pittsburgh punk scene.

 

The Target Shoots First
Chris Wilcha, 2000, 72 mins

Video diary of philosophy grad working at mail order record company, becoming involved in their attempts to market Nirvana and other grunge bands to their catalogue customers.
Interspersed with compilation of ads made from tracks on Moby’s Play album.

Cinema looping programme – part 2: The Future of Exploitation
12 March – 29 March, Wednesday to Sunday from 12-6pm

 

Dig!
Ondi Timoner, 2004, 100 mins
Parallel portrait of The Brian Jonestown Massacre and The Dandy Warhols in pursuit of fame.

 

What is a Group?
Ian Svenonius, 2016, 30 mins
‘The first Sci-Fi Documentary Rock ‘n’ Roll Exploitation Film.’

Interspersed with selected adverts:
John Lydon – Country Life
Bob Dylan – Chrysler
Robyn – Volve Drive-E

Cinema looping programme – part 3: Can Artists Sell Out?
30 March – 15 April, Wednesday to Sunday from 12-6pm

 

Arena Brains
Robert Longo, 1987, 35 mins
Satire of 80s New York artworld, including Ray Liotta as a money-mad artist.

Lukas & Hoffmann zu Gast bei der Künstlergruppe Schleifschnecke
Cosima von Bonin, featuring Nicolaus Schafhausen and Markus Schneider, 1994, 60 mins

 

Oliver Payne and Nick Relph, 2000, 25 mins
Two young artists, still at art school, try to connect pop music, youth culture, art and commodification.

 

The Sixth Year
Jay Chung and Q Takeki Maeda, 2013, 65 mins
Satirical online TV series about the art world.

Interspersed with extracts from Argument by Anthony McCall & Andrew Tyndall, 1978
Several short sections from the film with a blank screen in which a droning voiceover complains about the difficulty of combining a radical art practice with a corporate day job.

Realised with the support of the Stiftung der Landesbank-Baden-Württemberg, Hugo Boss and PhotoFabrics.

      

Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), 2018, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018, exhibition view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), exhibition view, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (detail), Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Paul Kelly, Take Three Girls (The Dolly Mixture Story), 2008 in The End of Selling Out, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Chris Wilcha, The Target Shoots First, 2000 in The End of Selling Out, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Christian Flamm, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2018 08.02.2018
L. Cohen
James Benning
Events
Discussion
Screening
08.02.2018

L. Cohen (2017, 48 mins) is a screening and conversation with James Benning in the Künstlerhaus Kino. On the evening, Benning talks on some of his works and core attitudes, including qualities of paying attention, being attuned and patient, heeding your own senses; honing them and heightening them. And the act of noticing how thoughts, memories, expectations, presumptions and self-distractions come teeming in.

James Benning, Künstlerhaus cinema, photo: Dina Karadžić
2018 20.01.2018
Spring Bloom in the Marginal Ice Zone
Jana Winderen
Events
Closing Event
Concert
20.01.2018

Spring Bloom in the Marginal Ice Zone is a concert by Jana Winderen, marking the launch of the final publication of Techne, with contributions by Judith Engel, Lina Lenzmann and Boris Ondreička.

Techne is a collaboration between Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Theater Rampe, realised with the support of Kulturstiftung des Bundes and the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK).

Spring Bloom in the Marginal Ice Zone, Closing event, 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2018 12.01.2018
One Rotation of This Light
Janis Eckhardt, Cerith Wyn Evans, Anne McGuire, Peter Wächtler
Events
Screening
12.01.2018

One Rotation of This Light is a programme of screenings in the part cinema, part sculpture, This Light by Andrew Norman Wilson. The first screening, Raumdunkel, selected by Fatima Hellberg and Johanna Markert brings together:

 

Degrees of Blindness by Cerith Wyn Evans
19 min ● SD Video ● Colour ● Sound ● 1988

 

Far Out by Peter Wächtler
4 min 24 sec ● HD Video ● Colour ● Sound ● 2016

 

All Smiles and Sadness by Anne McGuire
7 min ● SD Video ● B/W ● Sound ● 1999

 

Vögel sterben by Janis Eckhardt
3 min 27 sec ● HD Video ● Colour ● Sound ● 2017

 

Kim Wilde Auditions by Cerith Wyn Evans
5 min ● SD Video ● Colour ● Sound ● 1995

 

One Rotation of This Light continues in three cycles, extending over the evening, night and following day, organised and programmed in collaboration with Katharina Jabs and her film seminar at the Academy of Fine Arts, Stuttgart. Over the course of the 24 hours, work will be screened by artists and filmmakers including Cyprien Gaillard, Lucile Hadžihalilović, Brigid McCaffrey and Aleksei Yuryevich German, as well as found footage and stock material, selected from the This Light playlists.

 

For more information and the full programme, please visit thislight.org.

 

One Rotation of This Light is part of an ongoing series of events within Techne and the Decency of Means, an exhibition and collaboration between Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Theater Rampe. The project is realised with the support of Kulturstiftung des Bundes and the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK).

Cerith Wyn Evans, video still, Kim Wilde Auditions, 1995
2017 11.12.2017
Faust
Hans-Joachim Irmler
Events
Concert
11.12.2017

A concert by Hans-Joachim Irmler from FAUST.

2017 24.11.2017
Some Thoughts on the Invented Life
Bonnie Camplin
Events
Discussion
Screening
24.11.2017

A conversation reflecting on production from perspectives of means, survivalism and energy with Bonnie Camplin.

 

Alongside selected moving image work including:
Get Me A Mirror, 2006, 5′ 58”
Cancer, 2004, 4′ 39”
Terrazzo, 2008, 3′ 12”
Special Afflictions by Roy Harryhozen, 2006, 5′
Colonial Fanny, 2007, 1′ 33”
“A” (Like Akarova), 2006, 3′
Good Health, 2003, 2′ 50”

This screening and conversation is part of an ongoing series of events within Techne and the Decency of Means, an exhibition and collaboration between Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Theater Rampe. The project is realised with the support of Kulturstiftung des Bundes and the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK) as well as SV SparkassenVersicherung, pbb Stiftung Deutsche Pfandbriefbank, Hypo Kulturstiftung, Ritter Sport and ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen), Regierungspräsidium, Bezirksbeirat West and Bürgerstiftung Stuttgart.

Techne and the Decency of Means is curated by Fatima Hellberg and Johanna Markert (Künstlerhaus Stuttgart) with Marie Bues and Martina Grohmann (Theater Rampe). The title is a homage to poet, writer and filmmaker Stefan Themerson for whom the decency of means was the “aim of aims.”

2017 12.11.2017–21.01.2018
This Light
Andrew Norman Wilson with Saul Bass, Charles Bernstein, Alice Coltrane, Lucile Hadžihalilović, L. Q. Jones, William E. Jones, Elem Klimov, Andres Laracuente, Jon Lovitz, Toshio Matsumoto, Gunvor Nelson, Leontyne Price, Sterling Ruby, Boris Sagal, Saki Sato, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Aleksei Yuryevich, Andrzej Żuławski
Exhibition
12.11.2017–21.01.2018
Opening:
Sat, 11.11.2017
19:00 o’clock

“This sculpture and screening space proposes a free cinema, emerging out of a desire to make private viewing habits public. The cinema goes by the name This Light.”

As public space is rapidly moving into private property, and attention into the monetised distraction of streaming in solitude, this cinema activates viewing possibilities offered through networked technology. It opens up a subjective and meandering streaming of continuous content to a collective and public viewing experience.

The space is conceived and programmed with events and daily playlists by Andrew Norman Wilson and invited associates, as part of the exhibition Techne and the Decency of Means.

For the full programme and daily playlists, please visit: thislight.org

Techne and the Decency of Means and its associated events are realised with the support of Kulturstiftung des Bundes and the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK) as well as SV SparkassenVersicherung, pbb Stiftung Deutsche Pfandbriefbank, Hypo Kulturstiftung, Ritter Sport and ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen), Regierungspräsidium, Bezirksbeirat West and Bürgerstiftung Stuttgart.

 

 

 

2017 12.11.2017–21.01.2018
Techne and the Decency of Means
Ulrich Bernhardt, Tyler Coburn & Ian Hatcher, Annabella Spielmannleitner & Benjamin Köder, This Light and Andrew Norman Wilson
Exhibition
12.11.2017–21.01.2018
Opening:
Sat, 11.11.2017
17:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg, Johanna Markert, Marie Bues, Martina Grohmann

Techne and the Decency of Means extends from a long-running collaboration and production platform conceived by Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Theater Rampe. The project, which has developed and formulated itself through newly realised works by artists working across exhibition space and stage, draws on the ancient Greek understanding of ‘téchne’ as a methodology and attitude.
In its original classical usage, techne is a looping term, a description of making understood as material and functional, as well as immaterial and uncontainable. It is a term proposing a unity and interdependence of two forms of knowledge – theoretical and practical, without internal separation or hierarchy.
Many of the works in Techne and the Decency of Means inhabit multiple and simultaneously held roles and functions. From Andrew Norman Wilson’s This Light, operating as a sculpture, a cinema and a prototype, to Ulrich Bernhardt’s part-oven, part-sculpture and performance, Die Schrecklich Gute Mutter. These multi-form works are realised as settings, environments that are stepped into, a quality extending to the sculpture park and events space of Annabella Spielmannleitner and Benjamin Köder’s Setting Sculpture.

The video works, performances and structures in this exhibition have shared the production platform which is Techne, a framework focused on the conditions and movements between intention and material. What recurs in the works developed, is a curiosity and commitment to a process of thinking through materials, and of arriving at an understanding of form-content that involves an active attention to what making as a process reveals. This question of following both an original intention, but also attuning to the ways in which a technology or materiality shapes processes back, involves a reflection on conditions of alienation.

The ancient notion of techne is no longer in active use. And yet, this process has been one of staying put, for a longer period of time and through the realisation of multiple projects, with a term that oscillates, loops and negotiates between what is and what isn’t (yet). This exhibition is one point in these conversations, exchanges and productions, a process of introducing techne to doubt, ecological dread, and alienation, as well as to the pleasure and delight of bringing something into being.

This exhibition and its associated events are realised with the support of Kulturstiftung des Bundes and the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts, Baden-Württemberg (MWK) as well as SV SparkassenVersicherung, pbb Stiftung Deutsche Pfandbriefbank, Hypo Kulturstiftung, Ritter Sport and ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen), Regierungspräsidium, Bezirksbeirat West and Bürgerstiftung Stuttgart.
Techne and the Decency of Means is curated by Fatima Hellberg and Johanna Markert (Künstlerhaus Stuttgart) with Marie Bues and Martina Grohmann (Theater Rampe). The title is a homage to poet, writer and filmmaker Stefan Themerson for whom the decency of means was the “aim of aims.”

 

Andrew Norman Wilson, This Light, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Tyler Coburn, Remote Viewer, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Tyler Coburn, Remote Viewer (detail), 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Andrew Norman Wilson, This Light, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Annabella Spielmannleitner & Benjamin Köder, Setting Sculpture, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Annabella Spielmannleitner & Benjamin Köder, Setting Sculpture, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
One Rotation of This Light, Künstlerhaus 2018, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ulrich Bernhardt, Die Schrecklich Gute Mutter, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2017 11.11.2017
Elegy on Pharmakon
Boris Ondreička
Events
11.11.2017

A performance on writing as remedy and poison, the dark sciences and the ambivalence between mimetics and creativity.

Artist: Boris Ondreička
2017 21.10.2017
Smart People*, Perfect Couple and other works
Hildegarde Duane
Events
Screening
21.10.2017

An afternoon of films by Hildegarde Duane and the closing event of her exhibition, Western Woman at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

Hildegarde Duane, The Shape of the Universe, 1983, 1 min 57 sec
Hildegarde Duane and David Lamelas, Smart People, 1991, 10 min
Hildegarde Duane, Blind Drink, 1982, 1 min 10 sec
Hildegarde Duane, Perfect Couple, 1982, 8 min 30 sec
Hildegarde Duane and David Lamelas, Scheherazade, 1980, 24 min

 

The screening is preceded by a tour through the show by Fatima Hellberg at 4pm, and followed by a conversation with Duane.

 

*Hildegarde Duane and David Lamelas, 1991.

The exhibition and associated events are realised with support of the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts Baden-Württemberg, Albrecht and Sabrina Hauff, ZKM Karlsruhe, and optiplan. With special thanks to Württembergischer Kunstverein, LUX, and Eidotech.

Hildegarde Duane and Peter Ivers, 1982, photo: Ilene Segalove
2017 01.10.–29.10.2017
Die Revolution und Saturn streiten sich um ihr Kind
Sören Hiob
Exhibition
01.10.–29.10.2017
Opening:
Sat, 30.09.2017
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

Exhibition at Dold Projects, St. Georgen, Black Forest

 

Sören Hiob’s works look shocked, offended, disgusted, distant, and traumatised, but always poised and ready. This is a show of new and existing painting and video work.

Realised in collaboration between Künstlerhaus and Dold Projects.

Sören Hiob, Die Revolution und Saturn streiten sich um ihr Kind
2017 09.09.2017
Pink Slip
Hildegarde Duane, Steven Cairns, Fatima Hellberg
Events
Discussion
Screening
09.09.2017

Screening and conversation with Hildegarde Duane, Steven Cairns, and Fatima Hellberg.

 

Programme

Hildegarde Duane, Pink Slip, 1983, video, 7 min

Hildegarde Duane, Silk, 1977, video, 1 min 15 sec

Hildegarde Duane, East is Red, 1976, video, 26 min

Hildegarde Duane, The Shape of the Universe, 1983, video, 1 min 57 sec

Hildegarde Duane, Blind Drink, 1982, video, 1 min 10 sec
Hildegarde Duane, Freedom, 1988, video, 2 min 20 sec

Realised with support of the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts Baden-Württemberg, and Albrecht and Sabrina Hauff

Hildegarde Duane, Pink Slip (still) 1983, video, 7 min
2017 09.09.–22.10.2017
Western Woman
Hildegarde Duane
Exhibition
09.09.–22.10.2017
Opening:
Fri, 08.09.2017
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Steven Cairns, Hildegarde Duane, Fatima Hellberg

Los Angeles-based conceptual artist Hildegarde Duane has worked across mediums since the mid-seventies, courting the peripheries of mass media entertainment and its archetypal figures in her video and photo stories. This exhibition is the artist’s first solo presentation in Europe and brings together a comprehensive survey of work made between 1978 and today, exhibited over two floors of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

Western Woman, is simultaneously a nod towards the artist’s Californian roots, and the set of stereotypical conventions she both engages and unsettles in her work. Hildegarde Duane’s approach to feminism and feminist discourse speaks of an attitude and subversive mode of representation employing humour, irony, and ambiguity in equal measure. Her long-running fascination with the subtleties and potential perversions of the iconic representation speaks of a sensitivity towards the edge or tipping point of an image, what she describes as a “piercing quality, yet detached.”

 

Working with numerous collaborators, including Argentinian and ex-Angeleno artist David Lamelas, Duane’s practice is born from a spirit of collaboration initiated at the Long Beach Museum of Art in its multiple video programmes, commissions, and editing facilities from 1975. A recurring group of artists, actors, and musicians feature on and off camera. Other frequent collaborators, including Ilene Segalove, form a West Coast peer group of artists and video makers whose concerns preceded those of the Pictures Generation.

 

The exhibition highlights key works in the artist’s practice, incorporating video- and image-based installations while experimenting with scale and form. Many of the photo stories on display are reconceptualised by the artist for this presentation, juxtaposed with recent image and text pieces and monitors featuring key short videos. The enduring wit and tone of Duane’s work emphasise its currency; her bold visual style and consistently perceptive reinterpretations of the banal have a potency that defies easy categorisation but represents with irreverence and energy a continuous making and unmaking of the (female) image.

 

Realised with support of the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts Baden-Württemberg, and Albrecht and Sabrina Hauff

   

   

Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, Pink Slip, 1983, video, 7 min, photo: Frank Kleinbach.
Hildegarde Duane, Pink Slip (video still) 1983, video, 7 min, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane and David Lamelas, G.U.N., 1997, video, 12 min 15 sec, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, Juliet, 2003, installation view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, installation view, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hildegarde Duane, Goat to Wolf, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2017 08.09.2017
PURPUR SPYTT
Events
Concert
08.09.2017

A concert by Purpur Spytt on the ground level of Künstlerhaus, following the opening of Hildegarde Duane’s Western Woman.

 

Design: Moritz Finkbeiner
2017 04.06.–30.07.2017
Pinochet Porn
Ellen Cantor
Exhibition
04.06.–30.07.2017
Opening:
Sat, 03.06.2017
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

Künstlerhaus Kino
Level II

 

Followed by screenings Wednesday–Sunday
4 June–30 July, 12pm and 4pm

 

Künstlerhaus’ newly conceived cinema opens with Pinochet Porn (2008–16), an epic experimental film embodying the multifaceted work of the late artist Ellen Cantor (1961–2013). Cantor worked on this feature-length episodic narrative about the intertwined lives of five children and their maturation into adulthood for the final five years of her life.

 

The film originates in a suite of 82 drawings named Circus Lives from Hell (2005), which subsequently developed into the dramatic storyboard. Produced using Super 8mm, archival footage, and animated drawings, Pinochet Porn takes the form of a soap opera, at once tragic and comical and marked by a subversive sexuality. The story weaves between personal, political, and historical circumstances, obliquely revolving around the political discord of Pinochet’s regime in Chile. In the film, each child becomes a container for their distinct and complex experience of dictatorship – structures, which the characters later carry in their lives as adults, pointing to the film’s central question: is tragedy a choice?

 

Pinochet Porn is a document of an extended moment in New York and London avant-garde art and culture, featuring a range of artists, curators, writers, filmmakers, fixtures of the underground, musicians, and their children. This screening marks the German premiere of the work and follows a more long-running engagement with the practice and approach of Cantor, culminating in the book A history of the world as it has become known to me (Sternberg Press, Summer 2018), edited by Lia Gangitano, Fatima Hellberg, and Jamie Stevens.

 

Pinochet Porn (2008–16)
Super 8mm transferred to video (black and white and colour, sound), 123 min
Directed by Ellen Cantor

 

 

Photography: Frank Kleinbach.

Funded by the German Federal Cultural Foundation

Ellen Cantor, Pinochet Porn, Künstlerhaus Kino, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Pinochet Porn, Künstlerhaus Kino, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Künstlerhaus Kino, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Künstlerhaus Kino, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Pinochet Porn (2008–2016), 2016, installation view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Pinochet Porn (2008–2016), 2016, installation view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Pinochet Porn (2008–2016), 2016, Installation view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Pinochet Porn (2008–2016), 2016, video still, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2017 21.04.2017
YOUR WORDS IN MY MOUTH | MY VOICE ON YOUR TONGUE
Ghislaine Leung with Lucie Berjoan, Callum Copley, Ioanna Gerakidi, François Girard-Meunier, Rosie Haward, Asja Novak, Stefanie Rau
Events
21.04.2017

A collaborative set generated from YOUR WORDS IN MY MOUTH | MY VOICE ON YOUR TONGUE, a three day workshop by Ghislaine Leung focusing on transcription in its most material and lived sense through writing, reading and exhibition forms.

 

The YOUR WORDS IN MY MOUTH | MY VOICE ON YOUR TONGUE workshop and event series is developed by Leung, the Critical Studies department of the Sandberg Institute Amsterdam with Lucie Berjoan, Callum Copley, Ioanna Gerakidi, François Girard-Meunier, Rosie Haward,  Asja Novak, Stefanie Rau, and Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

2017 20.04.2017
Hollis & Money
Ghislaine Leung with John Knight, Jay Chung and Q Takeki Maeda, Loretta Fahrenholz, Kathy Acker, Jesper List Thomsen, Stephen G. Rhodes, Claudia Rankine, Rosa Aiello, Julia Heyward, Meredith Monk
Events
20.04.2017

An evening of video and readings presented by Ghislaine Leung.

 

Programme

Ghislaine Leung, Hollis and Money, 2017, spoken word (live), 5 min
John Knight, MacGuffin 8-2975, 1975, 16mm film transferred to digital video, b/w, no sound, 9 min 37 sec. Courtesy of Greene Naftali and Cabinet
Jay Chung and Q Takeki Maeda, Loretta Fahrenholz, The Sixth Year, Episode 2, 2013, digital video, colour, sound, 8 min 7 sec. Courtesy of the artists and Cabinet
Kathy Acker, Raw Heat, 1977, spoken word, 4 min 30 sec. Courtesy of Western Front Archive
Jesper List Thomsen, #L O V E O F G O D, 2015, spoken word (live), 7 min. Courtesy of the artist
Stephen G. Rhodes, Responsible Cats (with Keston Sutherland), 2016, digital video, colour, sound, 3 min 50 sec. Courtesy of the artist
Claudia Rankine, From Citizen, 2015, spoken word, excerpt 4 min 30 sec
Rosa Aiello, A River In It, 2015, digital video, colour, stereo sound, 9 min 48 sec. Courtesy of the artist. Voice by Olga Pedan
Julia Heyward, Shake Daddy Shake, 1976, 16 mm film transferred to digital video, b&w, stereo sound, 5 min 22 sec. Courtesy of the artist and EAI
Meredith Monk, Last Song, 2008, sound, 7 min 16 sec

 

Hollis & Money is in conjunction with YOUR WORDS IN MY MOUTH | MY VOICE ON YOUR TONGUE, a three day workshop with Ghislaine Leung, the Critical Studies department of the Sandberg Institute Amsterdam and Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

Hollis & Money was commissioned by Cell Project Space in conjunction with ICA, London as part of Ghislaine Leung’s The Moves at Cell Project Space

2017 11.02.–30.04.2017
Johanna
Dorota Jurczak
Exhibition
11.02.–30.04.2017
Opening:
Fri, 10.02.2017
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

They were two superior eels at the bottom of the tank and they recognized each other like italics1

The characters that populate Dorota Jurczak’s image world, human and non-human, share a mood that is at once candid and secretive. And this mood can also manifest as uneasiness. This is an exhibition of newly conceived etchings and bronze reliefs departing from the Künstlerhaus’ workshops, staged as an installation in the round.

 

Two central characters in the exhibition are the thin outlines of a young boy and girl, each standing by, and holding on to the doorknob of a half-opened, or closed, door. These human-size bronze reliefs are caught in the gauche threshold between waiting and entering. The characters do not see each other – their eyes are missing, although the delicately made doorknobs stare right back. There is a tension there between the desire to communicate and the desire to hide, which carries through in these sculptures but also in the figurations of the etchings. There is no single space within and between these works in which the essence as such resides, and instead an understanding is established; character is given with equal care to a bird, a breast, and the thin, long-handed boy and girl. Jurczak’s figuration suggests how much, or how very little, is needed for the spirit and idiosyncrasies of a being to be conjured up.

 

‘Johanna’ becomes the cipher or container of a potential character, or stand in for such, but also loops back to the name of a Künstlerhaus workshop manager with the same name. Johanna, this Johanna, is a meditation both on the fictional possibility and melody of a name, whilst carrying with it the reminder of the physical and collective process which enabled the characters to be made in the first place.

 

1  Anne Carson, Autobiography of Red, 1998

Supported by Corvi Mora, London, Sammlung Scharpff and

Dorota Jurczak, JOHANNA, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, JOHANNA, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, im 4. stockwerk (junge), 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, JOHANNA, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, sam, we dwoije, we troije, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, im 4. stockwerk (junge) (detail), 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, im 4. stockwerk (junge) (detail), 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, im 4. stockwerk (junge), 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, JOHANNA, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, im 4. stockwerk (mädchen), 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, JOHANNA, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, JOHANNA, exhibition view, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, introligator, urny, wykrzyknik, flasher, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, sam, we dwoije, we troije, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Dorota Jurczak, ptak I-VI, 2017, photo: Frank Kleinbach
DJ stand by Christian Flamm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
DJ stand by Christian Flamm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2017 07.02.2017
The Umbau Raum
Nicolaus Schafhausen
Events
Discussion
07.02.2017

The Umbau Raum was a project and service by Nicolaus Schafhausen, running in the years between 1996–98 at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. Operating without a fixed timeline and only partially defined in use, it was a space with furnishings and objects by artists, serving as a library, workspace, living room, and hangout.

 

The Umbau Raum as a site, but also as metaphor, is the starting point for this conversation between Schafhausen and Fatima Hellberg.

 

The evening is the first in a series of reflections and conversations drawing on the avant-garde legacy of the Künstlerhaus and some of the ways in which methods and attitudes of experimentation have been both extended and subverted, leading up to the anniversary of 2018.

Nicolaus Schafhausen, and the Umbau Raum, Nicolaus Schafhausen and Fatima Hellberg in conversation, 2017, photo: Sandra Schuck
Nicolaus Schafhausen, and the Umbau Raum, Nicolaus Schafhausen and Fatima Hellberg in conversation, 2017
2016 24.11.2016
Reality Models
Andrew Norman Wilson
Events

An offsite event as part of the launch of Techne at Theater Rampe.

 

Peppermint Park was an educational home video series produced in the 1980s by a group of investors seeking to profit off the narrative models that Sesame Street invented for educational children’s entertainment. The show features a cast of puppet characters who teach children various educational lessons, ranging from letters, numbers, colours, animals, and more. Growing up, a family friend had several copies of the VHS tapes and I remember being terrified of an unexplained dance sequence by a breakaway puppet dressed to look like a scarecrow (youtube.com/watch?v=RLq0XFmcTPE). A few years ago, clips from the show resurfaced online, and my relationship with the dancing scarecrow has shifted from horror to obsession.

 

In 2010 the physicist Aaron O’Connell and his colleagues proved that a strip of metal, visible to the naked human eye, can both oscillate and not oscillate at the same time. Essentially this means that objects, whatever their size, can be in two places at once. From here it starts to seem like existing means being inconsistent, while dying means becoming consistent. Or that classical logic – where things are either A or B, but never A and B at the same time – is being replaced by a quantum logic which says that all future possibilities exist in the present.

 

Any good theoretical physicist knows that their models of reality describe an aesthetic conceptual space in which matter is just information. In the words of O’Connell, “people have models of reality, and those models are descriptions, but they don’t get you any closer to the truth.”1 So the way things appear through physical causality takes place amongst a theatre of objects. This isn’t to say that there are screenwriters for our lives, just that every seeing, every measurement, is also an adjustment, a parody, a translation, an interpretation. And who could say that they never resort to narratives to make sense of things?

 

An entity moving towards death in quantum logic could be said to parallel the narrative convention of moving towards closure in cinema and literature. The frequency and duration of the action on the screen (plot) synchronises ever more tightly with the action in the chronological sequence of events (story). Let’s consider James Cameron’s science fiction actionthriller Terminator. In the year 1984, the Terminator arrives from the year 2029 to assassinate the film’s protagonist Sarah Connor. The entire movie consists of this pursuit, and ends when Sarah destroys the Terminator in a hydraulic press. Plot and story arrive at a 1:1 ratio – a consistency – and the viewers leave the theatre hypnotized by an amorous distance.

 

Resolution, transformation, development – the screens of cinema and television demand expressions of novelty. What this content emerges from and reproduces is a loop form – an aimless infinity of commercial product cycles concealed behind fresh faces and fashions. But in the exhibition space, the infinite causal loop becomes a narrative technique that can thrive on the surface. It is looping before anyone arrives and after everyone leaves. The loop of the narrative becomes a literal object.

I’m not trying to say I feel particularly liberated as an artist. And I’ve thought about buying a boat and learning how to fish so that I could eat the sea and drink the rain, free from the obligations that a rental apartment and an occupation require. But perhaps that red herring fishing lure I keep to serve as a reminder of this potential has me fooled, as a red herring would in a movie, to think that I would actually feel more free. Perhaps I should invest in a future and start saving and owning, instead of sleeping in living rooms and unfamiliar beds, all just to make things that no one can use.

 

Is a refrigerator a MacGuffin, a technique people use to orient narratives of economic growth, technological progress, and family values? A product to repeatedly fill with more products? If I had kids, would the fridge be the reason they stuck around? And when they didn’t need me anymore, would they love me in the same way? Would they fantasise about my death and receiving their inheritance? Never mind that, I am not that person right now. And either way I’m a straw man – a fallacy, a contradiction – just trying to get through this dog dick of a day. Perhaps there are many more days… even if it were entirely up to me I wouldn’t be so sure. I start to imagine the infinity of death and panic. I tremble from within this closed loop of thought, but feel connected to everyone else who has ever existed because of it. Being a person means being paranoid that I might be a puppet, and being an artist means making things that you want to see exist, to defy that paranoia, by communicating past anything you could rationally explain away.

 

1  Aaron O’Connell, “Struggling with Quantum Logic: Q&A with Aaron O’Connell” www.blog.ted.com, 2011 (accessed 19 Aug 2016)

photo: Luzie Marquardt
2016 22.10.2016
EASTER
Max Boss, Stine Omar
Events
Performance
22.10.2016

An evening with Max Boss and Stine Omar a.k.a. Easter at the Neue Schachtel – an offsite performance of the exhibition Hamlet at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

Neue Schachtel
Innerer Nordbahnhof
70191 Stuttgart

        

Easter, 2016
Easter, 2016
2016 20.10.2016
Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness
Alkisti Efthymiou
Events
Discussion
20.10.2016
Curated by:
anorak

The evening is part of Mixed Feelings, presented by anorak at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

It’s hard to know what we institute when we don’t institute but we do know what it feels like.
– Stefano Harney and Fred Moten

 

Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness is a two-part conversation with Alkisti Efthymiou looking at the affective reality of work in precarious (almost) institutions. The evening, set around an artificial campfire, will start with Alkisti sharing her experience and thoughts on her long-running involvement with the Athens Biennale. In this first part, Alkisti will attempt to express the inherent contradictions associated with, on one hand, a commitment to keep on believing in such an institution’s critical creative potential while at the same time struggling with frustratingly unstable conditions of work.
These thoughts will set the framework for a conversation around issues of precarity in a present of ‘crisis’ as ordinary and inscribed in the everyday; about why it feels so difficult to ‘institute’ when there is no way to know that – or what – we are instituting.

 

Mixed Feelings is hosted and curated by anorak, in collaboration with Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Palermo Galerie. Taking the form of a dinner, a screening, a conversation, and an exhibition, Mixed Feelings is centred around daily experiences and routines as ways of relating to a shared social sphere – the everyday as an atmosphere.

 

The exhibition at Palermo Galerie continues until 25 October and is open by appointment.

 

Kindly supported by Stiftung Kulturwerk and LBBW-Stiftung

Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness
Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness
Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness
Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness
Confusion, exhaustion, boredom and often bitterness
2016 01.10.–18.12.2016
Hamlet
Robert Ashley, Stephan Dillemuth & Nils Norman, Trisha Donnelly, Easter, Marie-Louise Ekman, Kristina Abelli Elander, Anne Haugsgjerd, Richard Vogel
Exhibition
01.10.–18.12.2016
Opening:
Fri, 30.09.2016
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg and Annika Eriksson

Hamlet is a group exhibition departing from a synonymous work by Swedish artist Richard Vogel. Taking the form of a video-assemblage of found and staged footage, Vogel’s version of Hamlet (1997) is a melancholic and wry meditation on what it means to order a life. In his work, there is a continuous and ambivalent attention to the slippages between desire and survivalism – of the ways in which living, and especially living together, always involves attending to that which exceeds the necessary, but is still crucial. The tragedy as a designation in Vogel’s Hamlet is the on-going and troubling prospect of trying to arrive at a form of life which can not only be tolerated, but described as a purposeful, perhaps even good, life.

 

This negotiation, and its pleasures and burdens, runs through the works in the exhibition, including that of filmmaker and playwright Marie-Louise Ekman’s Barnförbjudet / Adults Only (1979). The characters of Ekman’s work continuously speak across, over and beside each other, seeking and only momentarily finding ways of being together. How do we approach contradictions that seem shameful or disputable, or awkward, or uncomfortable? The tragedy is a container, a place where contradictions can unfold, be externalised and observed: a question of intimacy and distance that holds a key role in the works in this exhibition and its form.

 

In the show, there is a series of spatial shifts and props conceived between artist Annika Eriksson (mother) and Künstlerhaus’ artistic director Fatima Hellberg (daughter), alongside additional moving image work by: Robert Ashley, Stephan Dillemuth & Nils Norman, Trisha Donnelly, Richard Vogel, and Marie-Louise Ekman with Kristina Abelli Elander.

 

With an offsite performance by Easter, Saturday 22 October, 10pm at Neue Schachtel, Innerer Nordbahnhof, 70191 Stuttgart.

Marie-Louise Ekman, Barnförbjudet / Adults Only, 1979 (film, 82'), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Stephan Dillemuth & Nils Norman, Cramer, we have an Armageddon, 2008, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Trisha Donnelly, Untitled, 2004, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hamlet, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hamlet, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Robert Ashley, Perfect Lives, The Park (Privacy Rules), 1984, video, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Richard Vogel, Hamlet, 1997 (video, 50'), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Hamlet, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Anne Haugsgjerd, Upside Down Everything is Abstract… my father said, 2014 (video, 32'), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Marie-Louise Ekman, Barnförbjudet / Adults Only, 1979 (film, 82'), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Marie-Louise Ekman, Barnförbjudet / Adults Only, 1979, poster, 59 × 84 cm, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2016 11.09.2016
Green Introduction
Sören Hiob
Events
Screening
11.09.2016

Biergarten Tschechen & Söhne
Karlshöhe

 

An outdoor cinema on the Karlshöhe hill on Sunday 11th September with:

Sören Hiob’s
Light that Burns, 2014
The (Hair) Cut, 2014
Stay Still, 2010
Still Jungle, 2016
Green Introduction, 2016

 

Screening note: It would be confusing. Unforgivable. A great adventure.

 

The Freiluftkino takes place every year, in the final days of summer, overlooking the south valley of the city.

2016 24.07.2016
7 Types of Ambivalence
Mike Sperlinger, anorak
Events
Discussion
24.07.2016

7 Types of Ambivalence is a dinner and conversation with Mike Sperlinger. The evening is the first of Mixed Feelings, presented by anorak at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

 

Do feelings mix like drinks? Is Fremdschämen the opposite of Schadenfreude? Do we ever have unmixed feelings about contemporary art? Is ambivalence really the better half of irony? What is the difference, actually, between ambiguity and ambivalence? Should we feel ambivalent about misquoting William Empson for the title of this event? These are some of the questions which we might choose to discuss during a dinner prepared for us with special ambivalence, in which each course will be prefaced by a short presentation on subjects which we possibly care about more than we pretend to.

 

 

Kindly supported by

2016 24.05.2016
Empathy Exams
Leslie Jamison
Events
Talk
24.05.2016

In Illness as Metaphor, Susan Sontag described the heyday of a “nihilistic and sentimental” nineteenth-century logic that found appeal in female suffering: “Sadness made one ‘interesting.’ It was a mark of refinement, of sensibility, to be sad. That is, to be powerless.”

In this presentation, Leslie Jamison will reflect on the process of trying to write about female pain – as performed posture and authentic experience – and the broader question of how to represent suffering without mythologising it. How do we describe a wound without glamorising it? Jamison will talk about the process of trying to recruit as much of the world as possible to join her in this grappling: the personal histories and dreams of friends, the bloody lyrics of her favourite singers, the shower scenes in her favourite movies. What does it mean to crowdsource the wound – or the question of what our wounds mean to us?

 

The presentation is part of a series of parallel talks and screenings, departing from some of the key concerns and methods that informed the work of Ellen Cantor.

Photography: Mona Zeiler

Kindly supported by

Leslie Jamison, photo: Mona Zeiler
Leslie Jamison and Fatima Hellberg, photo: Mona Zeiler
Leslie Jamison and Fatima Hellberg, photo: Mona Zeiler
Leslie Jamison and Fatima Hellberg, photo: Mona Zeiler
2016 01.05.2016
Effort & Circumstance II
Abel Auer, Momus
Events
Discussion
01.05.2016

Café Weiß
Geißstraße 16
70173 Stuttgart

 

Abel Auer and Momus will discuss their respective experiences in the art world, and explore their inner motivations to continue and, in Beckett’s phrase, “fail better.”

 

Effort & Circumstance is a series of conversations around practice, survivalism and desire at Café Weiß. Using the setting of a bar, usually closed on Sundays, the gatherings take the form of semi-public conversations that exist somewhere between a talk about work, and its holding environment.

2016 02.04.2016
Whitby Weekender
John Cussans, Ellen Cantor
Events
Screening
Talk
02.04.2016

A part-screening, part-talk by artist and writer John Cussans on the work of Ellen Cantor, and their collaboration, Whitby Weekender.

 

John met Ellen Cantor in 2002 after a friend suggested that he should see her first film, Within Heaven and Hell. Following a meeting with Ellen they became close friends, collaborating on performances together and making Whitby Weekender, a video documentary about Northern Soul – the British dance and music subculture – filmed during John’s 40th birthday celebrations in 2005. The film was completed in 2006.

Kindly supported by

2016 02.04.–31.07.2016
ELLEN CANTOR
Exhibition
02.04.–31.07.2016
Opening:
Fri, 01.04.2016
19:00 o’clock

Ellen Cantor combined ready-made materials with diaristic notes and drawings to probe her perceptions and experiences of personal desire and institutional violence. In her drawings, paintings, collages, and videos, Cantor lifted characters and sequences from iconic films, reorienting the ideological transmissions of the source material. Fictional figures from Disney cartoons, cult horror films, New Wave cinema, and family movies provide a visual foil to Cantor’s intimate disclosures. Magnetised by the doleful naivety of characters such as Snow White and Bambi, Cantor would, in her drawings, extend their narrative horizons to include vivid sexual encounters and crisis-ridden relationships.

 

“My perversion is the belief in true love,” is what Cantor titled the only survey exhibition of her videos held in her lifetime. This phrase, a sincere emotional disclosure doubled up as an affront to the structural ‘perversions’ of normative desires, gets to the root of the materials in this exhibition. Cantor’s work always proceeds with a certain force of will: political in intent, figurative, precise, dramatic, emotional, and, as Cantor herself liked to put it, “adult in subject matter.”

 

A feature of the exhibition and the focus of the associated publication is Cantor’s film Pinochet Porn. Originally a suite of drawings named Circus Lives from Hell (2005), Pinochet Porn is an episodic narrative about five children growing up under the regime of General Augusto Pinochet in Chile. Featuring a cast of close friends and collaborators, and shot in New York and London, Pinochet Porn stages a libidinal critique of the systematic and sadistic destruction of self-expression and experience. History is made observable through Cantor’s fictive speculations on private experience within a totalizing political order. The story ends with a question: Is tragedy a choice?

 

This exhibition is formulated as a survey in the mode of the homage. It desires to bring together a rich body of work, articulating some of the key strands and ways of working that fuelled Cantor’s practice, in dialogue with some of the friends and collaborators that informed her work, those she called the circle of “magical intuitive co-operation.”

This exhibition, publication and associated events are realised with the support of Kulturstiftung des Bundes. Ellen Cantor – Cinderella Syndrome, the first chapter of this project was presented at CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco (8 December 2015–10 February 2016). With special thanks to Lia Gangitano and Participant inc, John Cussans, Joseph Grigely, Mark Cantor, and Jonathan Berger. Curated by Fatima Hellberg and Jamie Stevens.

All images courtesy of the Ellen Cantor Estate. Photography: Frank Kleinbach

Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Within Heaven and Hell, 1996 (video, 15' 52''), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2005, installation view, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Remember Me, 1999, (video, 10' 25''), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Within a Budding Grove, 2008, (detail), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2005, (detail), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Evokation of my Demon Sister, 2002, (video, 4' 38''), photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, phto: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Evokation of my Demon Sister, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You , 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You , 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Title unknown, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Death Skull , 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Title unknown, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Hold Me My Love, I Want to Die With You , 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Untitled (Grammercy Park Hotel), 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Pinochet Porn, production stills, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Pinochet Porn, production stills, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Circus Lives from Hell, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Cindarella Syndrome, 2016, phoo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, Cindarella Syndrome, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Ellen Cantor, installation view, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2016 19.03.2016
Fatima Hellberg zur neuen künstlerischen Leitung gewählt
News
19.03.2016

Künstlerhaus Stuttgart is delighted to announce the appointment of its new Artistic Director, Fatima Hellberg. The London-based curator was unanimously selected by the committee from a large and competitive international list of applicants. The appointment follows a line of Artistic Directors devoted to national and international excellence, with predecessors including Ute Meta Bauer, Nicholas Schaffhausen, Elke aus dem Moore, Axel John Wieder and most recently Adnan Yildiz.

Hellberg has curated exhibitions and projects in the UK and internationally, including at Tate Modern, South London Gallery, Malmö Konsthall (Sweden), ICA (London), and worked with artists and thinkers including Gregg Bordowitz, James Richards, Laurie Spiegel, Beatriz Preciado and Julia Heyward. She is curator at Cubitt in London (until June 2015), where she has been running a thorough and experimental programme of exhibitions, performances and publications and was previously curator at Electra, London.

Hellberg contributes to Frieze, Texte zur Kunst and Afterall and has given talks or lectured at If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want To Be Part of Your Revolution (Amsterdam), KunstWerke, (Berlin); Sandberg Institute (Amsterdam); Tate Modern (London); Museum of Modern Art Warsaw, and others. Originally from Sweden, Hellberg studied History of Art and Visual Culture at Oxford University and thereafter the Curating Contemporary Art MA at the Royal College of Art, London.

Hellberg’s programme at the Künstlerhaus is launched on 27 March 2015. The first chairperson of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Dr. Hannelore Paflik-Huber, sees the Board’s vote for Fatima Hellberg as a choice for an independent, intelligent and challenging program, furthering the Künstlerhaus’ tradition as an ambitious space for experimental work with a rich history, and distinctive vision.

2016 23.01.2016
Moon blows close
Graham Lambkin, Ed Atkins
Events
Discussion
23.01.2016

Graham Lambkin and artist Ed Atkins will discuss how matter, intimacy, accident and place figure in the making and reception of Lambkin’s work.

 

Graham Lambkin is a multidisciplinary artist based in Upstate New York who first came to prominence in the early 90s through the formation of his music group The Shadow Ring. Following the dissolution of The Shadow Ring Lambkin embarked on a series of striking and highly original solo releases, including Salmon Run (2007) and Amateur Doubles (2012), a critically acclaimed trilogy with experimental tape musician Jason Lescalleet: The Breadwinner (2007), Air Supply (2010) and Photographs (2013), and Making A (2013), a collaboration with renowned table-top guitarist and founding member of the  AMM group, Keith Rowe. His latest release, Schwarze Riesenfalter, sees Lambkin paired with Wandelweiser composer Michael Pisaro in a musical reimagining for the texts of Georg Trakl.

Photography: Mona Zeiler

Kindly supported by

Moon blows close, Graham Lambkin and Ed Atkins in conversation, 2016, photo: Mona Zeiler
Moon blows close, Graham Lambkin and Ed Atkins in conversation, 2016, photo: Mona Zeiler
Moon blows close, Graham Lambkin and Ed Atkins in conversation, 2016, photo: Mona Zeiler
Moon blows close, Graham Lambkin and Ed Atkins in conversation, 2016, photo: Mona Zeiler
Moon blows close, Graham Lambkin and Ed Atkins in conversation, 2016, photo: Mona Zeiler
2016 23.01.–06.03.2016
Moon blows close
Graham Lambkin
Exhibition
23.01.–06.03.2016
Opening:
Fri, 22.01.2016
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

It is difficult not to speak of weight when considering the work of Graham Lambkin: gravity, the removal of weight, and loss. His work with music came into consciousness in the early 1990s through The Shadow Ring. The sound of the group involved a restless and sensitive move between genres and forms: a D.I.Y post-punk ethic merged with cracked electronics and a close sense of the texture, feel and force of language.

 

As in his continued solo work and dialogues with other musicians – from Salmon Run and Amateur Doubles to Breadwinner and Making A – Lambkin’s drawings emerge from an acute sense of specificity around the depths of sound. Here method is an underpinning and cohesive principle: an intimacy and economy of means, a fascination with the domestic field recording and its potential vulnerability, and a necessary faith in the generative and transgressive potential of coincidence.

 

In Moon blows close, Lambkin’s largest exhibition to date, his long-running gravitation towards the edge of things is played out across a live performance, a specifically conceived salon, and a body of new drawing and painting based work. The space for the sound-based activities takes the form of a 40-metre painted backdrop – a curved soft architecture and holding environment for Lambkin’s performance and subsequent sound work, as well as a space for his conversation with Ed Atkins.

The mode of display for the new suite of watercolours and drawings for Moon blows close is a system of screens – a nod to Lambkin’s ambivalent impulse of hiding, layering and revealing in the build up and articulation of his practice. Despite the undeniable drive in the work towards the space of being in the zone – a space of deep concentration and relinquishing to a process – there is also an underpinning and restless sense of an affective politics in the practice. A dual melancholy and sense of the transience of things felt in the central poem and ‘mood board’ of Moon blows close:

 

Turning in to meet a kiss
three soft words blow close
through the open aperture
sending the day’s last message
the future of wind on stone

Now it is quiet
He puts out his hand,
and touches wax.

Realised with support from pbb Stiftung für Kunst und Wissenschaft.

Photography: Frank Kleinbach

Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Graham Lambkin, Moon blows close, 2016, photo: Frank Kleinbach
2016 22.01.2016
Moon blows close
Graham Lambkin
Events
Performance
22.01.2016

For Moon blows close, Lambkin has developed a large-scale painting and holding environment. In developing the 40-metre backdrop, Lambkin follows and digs out features – a tusk, the foot of a lark, a turtle. The work, which forms the setting for Lambkin’s performance and sound installation is at once an exercise of a method – following a necessary and purposeful faith in the coincidence of forms and thoughts – and a meditation on cohabitation and the profound depths of animal consciousness.

2015 13.12.2015
Effort & Circumstance I
Stephan Dillemuth, Saim Demircan
Events
Discussion
13.12.2015

Café Weiß
Geißstraße 16
70173 Stuttgart

Effort & Circumstance is a series of conversations around practice, survivalism and desire on Sunday afternoons at Café Weiß. Using the setting of a bar, usually closed on Sundays, the gatherings take the form of semi-public conversations that exist somewhere between a talk about work, and its holding environment.

The first session brings together Stephan Dillemuth and Saim Demircan in a part-screening, part-conversation on the ‘control image’ and ‘giving up’ as a method of reinvention. They will question these terms against the backdrop of Dillemuth’s work – from his early paintings and Disko Dekorationen in the 1980s to his most recent installation and assembly of animated kinetic bodies, The Damned.

2015 25.11.2015
HISTORY, HISTORICISM AND THE TEMPORALITIES OF THE AVANT-GARDE
John Roberts
Events
Talk

This talk, set within e d’ambiente by Jean-Michel Wicker and Michael Kleine, looks at the avant-garde not as a failed ‘event,’ but an ongoing research programme of social/asocial strategies. That is, modes of collective practice and learning, and conceptualizing affects, that continually challenge the prevailing logic of market and institution alike.

Kindly supported by

2015 03.10.–13.12.2015
e d'ambiente
Jean-Michel Wicker, Michael Kleine
Exhibition
03.10.–13.12.2015
Opening:
Fri, 02.10.2015
19:00 o’clock
Curated by:
Fatima Hellberg

copy copy copy
softly softly softly*

 

Smoke is the central stuff and structuring device of e d’ambiente, an exhibition by Jean-Michel Wicker staged with Michael Kleine. The smoke is approached as a screen, acting for or giving space, whilst lifting and removing information. e d’ambiente is a survey of sorts, but also a conversation between Wicker and Kleine and the articulation and enjoyment of a series of moods.

 

The show exploits the vertical architecture of the Künstlerhaus across two floors, and foregrounds through newly realised and existing works, a long-running engagement with the circuitous language of contemporary desire. Since the early 1990s Wicker’s prolific production has moved across publication, typography, sculpture, gardening and performance: slow and fast forms of circulation and release. A key component of the articulation of the publications, kinetic sculptures and floor sculpture / dance floor is a scenography staged by Wicker and Kleine. The newly realised setting dialogues with the symmetries and dissymmetries of the publication and sculptural display. The setup also strips down and transforms a structure originally conceived by architect Simon Jones, keeping the skeleton of the Salon and introducing its core to a carefully orchestrated set of connections across space and surface: relations between atmosphere, smoke, weight and scale. Here newly conceived works are also inserted into, and function as parts of the decor, including a photographic suite of Wicker’s anti-live performance nr. 2 framed in bright primaries. In terms of material and spatial decisions, the e d’ambiente scenography is shaped by the background and context of Michael Kleine’s work, which is formulated within a setting of opera and theatre. In his productions, Kleine often returns to the relation with the viewer, and how degrees of intimacy shift and unfold across time.

 

As an invitation, e d’ambiente carries forth a central practice of slowing down and speeding up the reading of positions. It is a process where also the rhythms and forms of circulation are an integral part of their aesthetic and political concerns: a parable and strong desire for change.

 

In parallel with e d’ambiente at Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Jean-Michel Wicker is presenting the exhibition futurbella at Bergen Kunsthall (30 October–16 December). These two, related, exhibitions represent Wicker’s biggest institutional presentations to date and are regarded by the artist as an integrated project distributed over two distinct spaces and sites.

Realised with the generous support of Bureau des arts plastiques and l’architecture of the Institut Français, Germany, and the French Ministerium for Culture.

Photography: Frank Kleinbach

Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, anti-painting 1 #e, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, anti-painting 2 #homogora dinosaurus, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, anti-painting 2 #homogora dinosaurus, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, anti-painting 2 #homogora dinosaurus, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, crazy or anti?, 2013, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, crazy or anti?, 2013, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, crazy or anti?, 2013, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, crazy or anti?, 2013, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, ping-pong graphic, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, ping-pong graphic, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, ping-pong graphic, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, ping-pong graphic, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, anti-live performance n°2, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, anti-live performance n°2, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker, jockel ABC, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach
Jean-Michel Wicker with Michael Kleine, e d'ambiente, 2015, photo: Frank Kleinbach